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I am trying to show a gradient field behind a plot, and then its density in a separate plot below.

I understand (as in this question) that this must normally be done using the ImagePadding directive. However, that does not quite align the plots in this case:

padding = {{20, 30}, {20, 30}}; 
GraphicsColumn[
  {
   Show[
    DensityPlot[PDF[NormalDistribution[0, 1], Log[x/40]] , 
      {x, 15, 60}, {y, 0, 30}, 
      ColorFunction -> "SunsetColors"], 
    Graphics[{Dashed, Gray, Line[{{40, 0}, {40, 30}}]}], 
    Plot[If[x < 20, 10, If[x < 25, 2 x - 30, 20]], {x, 15, 60}, 
      PlotRange -> {0, 30} , 
      PlotStyle -> {RGBColor[0.5, .7, 0.2], Thickness[0.01]}], 
    ImagePadding -> padding, PlotRangePadding -> None
   ], 
   Plot[PDF[NormalDistribution[0, 1], 5 Log[x/40]] , {x, 15, 60}, 
      PlotStyle -> {RGBColor[1, 0.4, 0], Thickness[0.01]},
      ImagePadding -> padding]
  }
]

Align me

Is there a way to get the abscissa ranges to match?

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3
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ You also need to set PlotRange explicitly for both plots $\endgroup$
    – Verbeia
    Apr 15, 2012 at 21:20
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ You might also need to explicitly set the AxesOrigin option in the bottom plot. $\endgroup$
    – Guillochon
    Apr 15, 2012 at 21:24
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ To those tempted to close: I believe the issue is slightly different from earlier alignment questions. Please don't close. $\endgroup$ Apr 15, 2012 at 22:14

2 Answers 2

13
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AbsoluteOptions shows there to be several differences between the output settings of the first and second plots:

Grid[Prepend[Transpose[
     AbsoluteOptions[#, {PlotRangePadding, AspectRatio, 
           Frame}] & /@ {plot1, plot2}], {"first", "second"}], Frame -> All]

settings

It'll look better if you use the same aspect ratio (I used 1/GoldenRatio) and a frame in each picture. I also set PlotRangePadding-> None in the second case.

plots

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2
  • $\begingroup$ Your method of examining AbsoluteOptions is very generalizable. I think it's great. $\endgroup$
    – Brian B
    Apr 16, 2012 at 2:05
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks. It's probably still a good idea to first scan the output of AbsoluteOptions[plot1] and AbsoluteOptions[plot2] to identify the options you want to compare. $\endgroup$
    – DavidC
    Apr 16, 2012 at 12:21
4
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Use for example Framed[]:

padding = {{20, 20}, {20, 20}};
GraphicsColumn[{
  Framed[Show[
    DensityPlot[
     PDF[NormalDistribution[0, 1], Log[x/40]], {x, 15, 60}, {y, 0, 
      30}, ColorFunction -> "SunsetColors"],
    Graphics[{Dashed, Gray, Line[{{40, 0}, {40, 30}}]}], 
    Plot[If[x < 20, 10, If[x < 25, 2 x - 30, 20]], {x, 15, 60}, 
     PlotRange -> {0, 30}, 
     PlotStyle -> {RGBColor[0.5, .7, 0.2], Thickness[0.01]}], 
    ImagePadding -> padding, PlotRangePadding -> None], 
   FrameStyle -> Directive[White]],
  Framed[Plot[
    PDF[NormalDistribution[0, 1], 5 Log[x/40]], {x, 15, 60}, 
    PlotStyle -> {RGBColor[1, 0.4, 0], Thickness[0.01]}, 
    ImagePadding -> padding, Frame -> True], 
   FrameStyle -> Directive[White]]}]

enter image description here

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1
  • $\begingroup$ Nice, sneaky trick! $\endgroup$
    – Brian B
    Apr 16, 2012 at 2:04

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