Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
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Here's a collection of resources that I started on Mathgroup (a collection of Mathematica learning resources) and updated here at Stack Overflow. As this site is dedicated to Mathematica it makes more sense to maintain it here. This represents a huge amount of information; of course it's not exhaustive so feel free to improve it! Also, don't hesitate to ...


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To download a licensed copy of Power Programming with Mathematica by David B. Wagner, please click here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/j2dsyvptnxjd369/Wagner%20All%20Parts-RC.pdf Thank you to McGraw-Hill for granting me the license to scan and distribute this out-of-print text to the Mathematica community! Thank you to Manfred Plagmann (aka matariki) for ...


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My original post above became too big so I'm splitting it into two posts. The tips and tricks section that I used to keep track of interesting new posts mostly on this site was big so here it is. Note the tags at the end of each question on this site in order to read related questions. I'm further dividing this post. See my third answer on Advanced ...


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After having used Mathematica for a couple of years, more or less only to abuse it as a neat plotting and integral solving engine, Leonid Shifrin's Mathematica Programming was my first book that brought me closer to actually understanding how Mathematica works. I soon lost my fear of # & @ @@ @@@ /@ //@. (Plus the book is free, and if you still need ...


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Third part of my collection of links, dedicated to advanced evaluation, pattern matching and neat algorithms (which is quite arbitrary but contains a lot of interesting Q&As in my opinion). Advanced evaluation of expressions Non standard evaluation allows to work on the symbols of an expression before they get evaluated. Here's how I represent ...


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Exciting news! After nearly two months of agonizing communication, McGraw-Hill has granted me a license to scan one copy of "Power programming with Mathematica" for the purposes of distributing it (freely) throughout the Mathematica user community here on StackExchange. First, thanks to everyone for showing support on this .... sorry it took so long. ...


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I highly recommend examining the included packages under your Mathematica installation directory: \AddOns\ExtraPackages \AddOns\LegacyPackages \AddOns\Packages \AddOns\Applications You can also find examples of good practice, framework guidelines, and insider methods in the presentations from various Mathematica conferences. A mere ...


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Besides the documentation, which I find very helpful, I also like the following resources: The Wolfram Demonstrations Project is a fantastic resource, where you can draw up previously successful programs and learn some best practices. Their utility has varied, but I've certainly learned a lot by seeing great code in practice. In a similar vein, I also ...


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I have packaged the electronic files that came on the original floppy and posted them in a ZIP archive on my web site, at: http://www.verbeia.com/mathematica/PowerProgMa.zip File size is 119 kb. Sorry for the delay. Enjoy!


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I can provide an approach by finite elements and an application of the functional calculus of selfadjoint operators. Background The spectrum of the Laplacian on a bounded domain $\varOmega$ with sufficiently smooth boundary subject to homogeneous Dirichlet boundary conditions is discrete. By the spectral theorem, there are eigenfunctions $e_i \in H^1_0(\...


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In my opinion, rules and pattern matching are central to mastering Mathematica. I strongly recommend Demystifying Rules by Nancy Blachman published in The Mathematica Journal, Volume 8, Issue 4, for a solid grounding in this area. It is available on-line at The Mathematica Journal


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Easily one of the best books ever written on Mathematica is David Wagner's Power Programming with Mathematica: The Kernel. It was written more than ten years ago at a time when version 3 of Mathematica was current but is every bit as much relevant today as it was then since the foundation on which Mathematica is built has not changed that much over the ...


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Most of the financial modeling/Mathematica books I've seen are intended to (1) provide theorical insights and Mathematica based tools to price "exotic" derivatives, and/or (2) to show how to use Mathematica to develop derivative trading strategies. Very helpful for experienced quants. Not the best way to learn about investing. Successful investing ...


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Short version I think mathematica is a good first programming language, and Stephen Wolfram has dropped some hints in a few places that it should get even better at being a beginner programming language soon: It'll probably be related to my goal in the next year or two of making Mathematica definitively the world's easiest to learn language... More ...


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For neat tips and tricks, there is a daily tip posted to the MathematicaTip twitter page.


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The Mathematica GuideBook by Michael Trott always gives me lots of inspirations. Beside of it (and other places been mentioned above), I like exploring the SystemFiles folder. Some interesting tricks (especially about interface and FrontEnd) are hiding there.


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The 'Mathematica GuideBook' series by Michael Trott has tons of good examples that go much further than typical 'toy-examples'. I found it a very valuable and thorough ressource for learning the ins and outs of the Mathematica language.


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Nobody's mentioned the packages that come with Mathematica. There's a heap of great coding examples in there, especially the later packages.


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Mathematica is the best tutorial. It is a discovery tool - just start from something that he knows a bit already and you both take one little step at a time. Just try things. 1st Thing - Try this Link => Hands-on Start to Mathematica I personally would recommend engaging with him in a project of making an application and submitting it to the Wolfram ...


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Update: I described an alternative approach based on built in plotting functions in this answer. That approach is not very practical here though because I need to be able to handle points at arbitrary positions while built in functions work with a rectangle-based mesh. I am still looking for improvements. I came up with this very naive approach and ...


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OK, I will start with a few suggestions. I think, that what you really need is to understand Mathematica evaluator. Once you get this understanding, programming in Mathematica will become vastly easier for you, and you will be ready for the advanced examples showing the power of rules. So, here are the steps I'd take: Read the book of David Wagner, "Power ...


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I would recommend these two, in the order listed: Wolfram Language: Fast introduction for programmers Besides the generic edition, there are currently two special editions of this tutorial available for programmers with previous experience in Java or Python. It appears that they are working on more versions for programmers with backgrounds in various ...


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Fourth fork of the list of links. Manipulate/Dynamic Using Refresh[..] with TrackedSymbols Got Manipulate? (Seminar slides) Manipulate secrects revealed What is the equivalent of a prototypical Manipulate in lower level functions? Selective evaluation of blocks of code in a Manipulate Understanding CDF How to modularize custom controls for ...


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I own a copy of Modelling Financial Derivatives with Mathematica by William Shaw. I think it was a ground-breaking book for its time. However, here are some issues you should be aware of: It was published in 1998 and is based on Mathematica version 3. We are now at 8, anticipating 9. Much of the graphics code he uses is now obsolete (eg Graphics`Graphics). ...


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Update (01-11-2013) I've contacted McGraw-Hill and was able to talk to one of the original editors involved in publishing this book. His response is that McGraw-Hill does not have the electronic (i.e. PDF) files necessary to offer this text again by print-on-demand. If the electronic files existed, they would be able to do it, but they can't because the ...


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The printed version of the 2002 edition was printed 3 times and sold out 3 times; Springer and Google recently started selling it (book only) as a PDF eBook (no software) on the Springer and Google sites for $79. I know other authors (e.g. here) have gone to some trouble to make their books available here on stack exchange ... We are delighted to be able ...


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So I have a little bit more info, but mostly a learning technique we can test: Init I wanted to see when each of these was called so I made each possible handler (without a previous assignment) just call Print. Then I found that for "Wolfram.System.Print" this is a terrible idea as it is called anytime the system prints. So I removed that. Here's what I'm ...


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The Official Elementary Introduction is also very good to learn some basic stuff.


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Affirming Vitaliy's suggestions I'll say something beyond his comprehensive answer and to a certain extent more specific. A great mathematician S.Banach used to say (maybe as a joke) that children shouldn't be taught mathematics early because that would be a too sharp tool for them. There is an obvious analogy and this is why children shoudn't be taught ...


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One unconventional but possibly very useful approach it to introduce him to Project Euler. While many of the newer questions are completely beyond me (mind you that is not saying much), many of the earlier ones are quite approachable. If your friend has the desire to learn and an interest in puzzles/challenges, this site will grow as he grows. Most of the ...


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