15

Here's a starting point for you: With[{n = 6}, Graphics[MapIndexed[{ColorData[103] @@ #2, #1} &, NestList[MapAt[Composition[ TranslationTransform[AngleVector[2 π/5]/ GoldenRatio], ...


10

Edition {c, b, a} = SASTriangle[1, 36 Degree, 1][[1]]; α = -1 + GoldenRatio; β = 1 - α; (*p[n_/;n≥4]:=p[n]=α*p[n-1]+β*p[n-3];*) m = {{0, 1, 0}, {0, 0, 1}, {β, 0, α}}; tri[1] = {a, b, c}; tri[n_] := tri[n] = m . tri[n - 1]; mat = Limit[MatrixPower[m, n], n -> Infinity]; center = mat . tri[1] // First; p[n_] := First@tri[n]; θ[1] = ArcTan @@ N@(p[1] - ...


8

Block[{θ = Pi/5., n = 6, c = Cos@θ, s = Sin@θ, f = AffineTransform[{{{c - 1, s}, {-s, c - 1}}, {-c, s}}], pts := NestList[f, {{0, Cot[θ/2]}, {-1, 0}, {1, 0}}, n], vc := Table[Hue[i/(n + 1)], {i, 0, n}, {3}]}, Graphics[Polygon[pts, VertexColors -> vc]] ]


5

It's a simple method: Graphics[Map[HalfLine, Partition[ AnglePath[ Prepend[ Table[{(2 Sin[18 Degree])^n, -108 Degree}, {n, 1, 10}], {1, -72 Degree}]], 2, 1]]] But this method has a lot of extra half-lines. The following code works better: Graphics[{Opacity[ 0.6], {Table[FaceForm[RandomColor[]], 10], Map[Triangle, ...


5

Actually, g[a,T] have analytic expression. Integrate[f[v, T], {v, a, Infinity}, Assumptions -> T > 0] $$1.\, -\frac{1. \sqrt{a^2} \text{erf}\left(0.0438624 \sqrt{\frac{a^2}{T}}\right)}{a}+\frac{0.0494935 a e^{-\frac{0.00192391 a^2}{T}}}{\sqrt{T}}$$ Integrate[f[v, T], {v, 0, Infinity}, Assumptions -> T > 0] 1 kb = 1.381*10^-23; Nav = 6.022*...


4

We can get the coordinates of successive triangles by finding the "AngleBisectingCevianEndpoint" using TriangleConstruct: nextTriangle[{a_, b_, c_} ]:= {TriangleConstruct[{a, b, c}, "AngleBisectingCevianEndpoint"][[1]], a, b} Use NestList starting with N @ SASTriangle[1, 36 Degree, 1] to get n triangles: triangleList[n_]:= NestList[...


3

Here is an example with Overlay[]: Manipulate[ With[{a = If[m2 > m1 (\[Mu] Cos[\[Theta]] + Sin[\[Theta]]), ( 9.8 (m2 - \[Mu] m1 Cos[\[Theta]] - m1 Sin[\[Theta]]))/( m1 + m2), ( 9.8 (m2 + \[Mu] m1 Cos[\[Theta]] - m1 Sin[\[Theta]]))/(m1 + m2)], T = If[m2 > m1 (\[Mu] Cos[\[Theta]] + Sin[\[Theta]]), ( 9.8 m1 m2 (1 + \[Mu] Cos[\...


3

The same issue arises when we use CalloutMarker -> Arrowheads[Medium] or CalloutMarker -> Arrowheads[.02] in combination with Manipulate andImageSize -> Full. A simple fix is to use ImageSize -> Scaled[1] instead of ImageSize -> Full: Manipulate[Plot[Callout[x, "x", CalloutMarker -> "Arrow"], {x, 0, 1}, ImageSize ->...


3

This probably counts as hardcoding ranges, but it works: Manipulate[ Show[ParametricPlot[{{-Cos[x], -Sin[x]}, {Cos[x], Sin[x]}}, {x, Max[{0, a - Pi}], a}, PlotRange -> {{-1.05, 1.05}, {-1.05, 1.05}}, PlotStyle -> {Red, Blue}, Ticks -> False], ListPolarPlot[{{a, 1}}, PlotRange -> All, PlotStyle -> PointSize[.05]], ...


3

Evaluating the integrals used to produce the value shown in the inset will produce, as is pointed out in cvgnt's answer, a major improvement in your code's performance, but there are other improvements you can make. The following code shows how I would refactor your Manipulate, not only to improve performance, but also to improve the user experience. kb = 1....


3

I introduced the function fun and TrackedSymbols-{..} as well as {{func, 1}, {1 -> "a", 2 -> "e", 3 -> "q"}} into the Manipulate. The rest is the same. The changed Manipulate: Manipulate[ fun[sel_, t_] := Switch[sel, 1, RDsolR\[Rho]a[Rast, \[Rho], a0*au][[1]][t], 2, RDsolR\[Rho]a[Rast, \[Rho], a0*au][[2]][t], 3, ...


2

Plot looks at the unevaluated form of the first argument. If it sees one function the plot will be in one color, only when the unevaluated first argument consists of several functions, multicolor are used. Therefore, you need to force evaluation of the first argument: Manipulate[ Plot[Evaluate@TwoSig[t, p, r], {t, -10, 30}, PlotRange -> All, PlotStyle ...


2

There is also built-in functionality that is much like what you ask for. If you import your image, click on it, and choose the "Coordinates Tool" then you get a numerical readout of the position and r-g-b values of the image. You can "zoom in" by selecting the Tooltip Options to set the range of pixel values displayed in the popup box.


2

Your question is poorly written for this site. You should try to minimize your code and identify where the first errors are. Then ask the specific errors here on this site, we can help. We don't normally fix all the code like I have done below I recommend you read the following https://www.wolfram.com/language/fast-introduction-for-math-students/en/ http://...


2

This is a simple oneliner which kind of works. Check out the published version here: public cloud link. I personally still find most of these cloud-deployed Manipulate (or DynamicModule) toy-examples way too slow, but maybe someone from Wolfram has a clever trick to get a similar responsiveness as in a local notebook? SystemOpen @ CloudDeploy[#, "...


2

Is this what you had in mind? idea 1 Manipulate[ pred2o[{atomCount, molecularMass, radiusOfGyration, planeOfBestFitDistance} ], {atomCount, 20}, {molecularMass, 146}, {radiusOfGyration, 2.5}, {planeOfBestFitDistance, 0.55}, ControlType -> InputField] idea 2 Manipulate[ pred2o[ {atomCount, molecularMass, radiusOfGyration, ...


2

Here is your corrected code, try to understand it. Note that the zeros are mostly real. And if they are complex, the imaginary part is very small. Maybe you want to change the parameters? Manipulate[ zeros = NSolve[{6 \[Alpha] (2 z \[Alpha] + \[Xi] - \[Nu] Conjugate[ z]) + (2 z \[Alpha] + \[Xi] - \[Nu] Conjugate[z])^3 == 0 && ...


1

Clock Panel @ Graphics[{Red, Rectangle[{0 + #, 0}, {2 + #, 0.5}] & @ Dynamic[Clock[{1, 10, .1}]]}, PlotRange -> {{1, 10}, {-1, 1.5}}, ImageSize -> Large] Animate v = 1; Animate[Framed @ Graphics[{Red, Rectangle[{0 + x, 0}, {2 + x, 0.5}]}, PlotRange -> {{1, 10}, {-1, 1.5}}, ImageSize -> Large], {{x, 1, ""}, 1, 10, ...


1

Added sample data for performance testing -- see Update below. The Manipulate controls for latitude and longitude allow the minimum values to be greater than the maximums. Is this the problem you want to fix in a more natural way? I suggest a better method is to use latitude and longitude controls for the center of a region, and separate controls for the ...


1

You must use "Manipulate" and leave out the superfluous (in "Manipulate") "Dynamic". Here is the corrected code: ClearAll[p]; p[m_, n_] := Function[{x}, -7 - m - n + m n + (-7 m - 8 n + 3 m n) x + (10 - 5 m - 8 n + m n) x^2 + (6 - m - 2 n) x^3 + x^4 // Evaluate] Manipulate[ m = pt[[1]]; n = pt[[1]]; r = x /. ...


1

The Epilog can be added with Epilog -> {Red, Dashed, InfiniteLine[{{0, Roche[\[Rho]]}, {10, Roche[\[Rho]]}}] } inside your Plot command(s), as in for example Manipulate[Column[{ Style["Working Plot", Bold], Plot[fun[func, t]/scale[func], {t, 0, 9*Gyr}, FrameTicks -> fRDticks, Epilog -> {Red, Dashed, ...


1

$Version (* "12.2.0 for Mac OS X x86 (64-bit) (December 12, 2020)" *) Clear["Global`*"] Constants au = QuantityMagnitude[UnitConvert[Quantity[1, "AstronomicalUnit"], "Meters"]]; c = QuantityMagnitude[ UnitConvert[Quantity[1, "SpeedOfLight"], "MetersPerSecond"]]; Qpr = 1; Lsun = ...


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