29

This message is a warning delivered by High Sierra that the application you're running is a 32-bit application. In our case, it's specifically referring to the Mathematica front end, which is not only 32-bit, but also still running against the legacy Carbon APIs for accessing the windowing system. The Mathematica bundle also contains a small number of ...


21

Mathematica 10.0 and later now support retina resolutions on OS X.


21

Another option is the free app Retinizer, which I used for a while with Mathematica 8. It cleaned up the text, but I found caused visual glitches with the documentation and added some instability throughout. That said, it made the text look beautiful which helped the eyes when reading a lot of code. You can turn it on and off, and it works on other ...


19

Possible workaround (one that I haven't tested too extensively) Needs["RLink`"] JLink`UninstallJava[]; InstallR["RVersion" -> 3, "RHomeLocation" -> "/Library/Frameworks/R.framework/Resources", "NativeLibLocation" -> "/Library/Frameworks/R.framework/Resources/Library/rJava/JRI"]; REvaluate["R.version.string"] (* {"R version 3.5.0 (2018-04-23)"...


19

As already stated elsewhere, versions 11.3 and earlier simply cannot run on Catalina because Apple removed support for 32-bit applications. And, unfortunately, creating a 64-bit 11.3.1 impossible, because the 11.3 FrontEnd is a "Carbon" application, rather than a "Cocoa" application. We've been working on rewriting the FrontEnd in Cocoa for several years, ...


18

No, unfortunately there are no easy workarounds - MacOS Catalina simply doesn't support 32-bit apps, and the Mathematica frontend for 11.3 and earlier is a 32-bit app. To solve this, you must either upgrade your license or downgrade your version of MacOS. You may also have some luck contacting Wolfram Support and seeing if they can help you.


14

Here's how to do it for more recent versions of Mathematica (specifically, 9.0.1): Get Retinizer, mentioned in other posts Show Package Contents of Mathematica, navigate to ../Mathematica/Contents/ and open Info.plist for editing. Delete the lines for NSHighResolutionCapable:True. Save the plist. Open Retinizer and drop Mathematica onto it as instructed. It ...


14

The airport utility on your mac (which is not very widely known) gives you programmatic access to all your wireless information. I wrote a fun answer on Ask Different using this command line utility. To get the information about wireless devices around you, use the -s flag. Here's a simple function to automate it: getSSID[] := With[{data = Import["!/System/...


14

A quick Google search returned: How can I trigger a Notification Center notification from an AppleScript or shell script? Based on this, we can use notify[asc_] := RunProcess[{"osascript", "-e", StringTemplate["display notification \"`message`\" with title \"`title`\""][asc]}] notify[<|"message" -> "I'm finished!", "title" -> "Mathematica"|...


11

As explained in the section tutorial/CitationManagement you need to have EndNote or BibTeX for managing your citations. Interaction with both is covered in this tutorial. Below is the result I obtained using the sample BiBTeX file downloaded here. Don't forget to work in a cell with the Text style (Alt-7 on Windows) when you use this, otherwise the ...


11

This answer is complementary to Ian's. Retinizer appears to work very well with Mathematica 9. It increases even the resolution of Graphics, but not Graphics3D. To get a prettier view of a Graphics3D, one can use the following function: retinize[g_, n_: 2] := Image[Rasterize[g, "Image", ImageResolution -> n 72], Magnification -> 1/n] Here's an ...


11

Update: Mathematica 12.0 now supports this. You can't. This feature only works with certain programs and as of version 10.4 Mathematica is not one of them. Maybe the coming Mac front end improvement mentioned in this presentation will fix that, but this is purely a guess on my part. As a workaround you can use window control software such as Spectacle, ...


9

If you are using OS X the use undocumented Method -> {"TransparentPolygonMesh" -> True}


9

The answer is that yes, you can affect the appearance of components of a control but the problem in this case is that your list of appearances appearances = {"DialogBox", "Palette", "FramedPalette", "Frameless"}; are only valid Button appearances and that is why they have no effect of ButtonBar or TabView. When you use valid appearances it works fine: ...


9

What I do is the following. Save the following code as a text file in a permanent location under the name MathematicaLauncher.scpt: tell application "System Events" try get process "Mathematica" on error -- Not running, launch and run launch application "Mathematica" -- May need to wait until application finishes launching ...


9

A couple of general points before I delve into the specifics of this question 1) There will always be some OS difference in behavior and performance, even on the same hardware. We hook into OS APIs where appropriate, and we generally use native system compilers. Thus, if there are real differences between compilers, they might appear in the product (and ...


9

I let Mathematica parse the input into a speakable string, but then I send it to the operating system as if going through the command terminal. This allows me to set the voice flag for my installed voices. mySpeak[input_, voice_String:"Allison", options:OptionsPattern[Speak]]:= CompoundExpression[ Run["say -v " <> voice<>" " <> ...


9

Download the latest WolframScript installer, which will work on macOS 10.14: The installer from wolfram.com/wolframscript should work – ilian Oct 25 at 16:10


8

On OS X, it's called MathKernel and not mathematica or math. This file is located in the directory given by: FileNameJoin[{$InstallationDirectory, "Contents", "MacOS"}] You can see a partial list of files in that directory: FileNames["Math*", FileNameJoin[{$InstallationDirectory, "Contents", "MacOS"}]] (* { "/Applications/Mathematica 9.app/Contents/...


8

You can always create your own custom controls. This is a lot of work, but it also gives you unlimited flexibility. You can even create completely new kinds of control. Scroll down to the last section here to see an example. If you're aiming for a custom TabView-like control, I'd start with PaneSelector. Here's a primitive example (just a start, not ...


8

Basically, I came to the same conclusions as user6629 and Szabolcs. This means there are two solutions for the commandline. Specify -lstdc++.6 which is very weird, because on my machine libstdc++.dylib is just a link to libstdc++.6.dylib too. I traced the linker output and it really uses the correct library from /usr/lib which gives me some headache. Use -...


8

I think this is an OS X issue. Note that if you launch Mathematica from a terminal, you will get the value of Environment["PATH"] which you expected. For GUI applications that are started through Finder/LaunchServices, the environment (and $PATH in particular) is different and determined by the OS (this is a related recent question that had to do with ...


8

Yes, it works well. No issues, other than crashes when opening fonts, yet.


8

I received a response from Wolfram Cutomer Support today regarding this question. The answer was to update to Version 12 !!! I think this is completely shameless. I have Version 11.3, which is Wolfarm's second most recent version of its software, which it apparently refuses to update even though Apple has long announced that 32-bit programs will not work. ...


7

Let's put the answers together: Version 9.0.1 is compatible (acl, halirutan) Version 8.0.4 seems compatible too (bill s, Szabolcs)


7

This isn't exactly an answer, but more of an observation. I'm running V.9.0.1 on OS X 10.6.8. When I try to work with your functions f1P and f2P, I experience behavior that is somewhat different from the behavior you describe, but certainly not any more pleasant. With a fresh kernel I can evaluate either function definition without any apparent problem. ...


7

If you are familiar with AppleScript, you could try an approach like this: (* from http://github.com/fmeinberg/AppleScript *) AppleScript["RunFile", file_] := Run["osascript " <> file] AppleScript["RunScript", script_] := Block[{file = ToFileName[$TemporaryDirectory, "script.txt"]}, Export[file, script, "String"]; AppleScript["RunFile", file]] ...


7

[ UPDATE 9/17/2014: I can confirm this problem is fixed in v10.0.1.0 ] WRI has confirmed this as: "a known issue between Mathematica and the new 2013 Macbook". And says they are working on fixing it for the next major release. FYI I'm running 2013 macbook w/ the discrete Nvidia card, & max memory, if that helps anyone who is trying to match my system. ...


7

This is a very empirical answer, so I hope that someone more authoritative will chime in, but here's what I found. I am on Mathematica 10.3.1 on Win7-64bit. I generated a silly animation: a = ExampleData[{"ColorTexture", "GiraffeFur"}]; b = ExampleData[{"ColorTexture", "CatFur"}] // ImageCrop[#, ImageDimensions[%]] &; frames = Table[Blend[{a, b}, x], {...


7

Ok, so the quick way to find given directory is just to use SystemOpen @ dir. E.g. SystemOpen @ $UserBaseDirectory I go there all the time so I added a menu to the main menu in order to not write this each time. Here's the procedure: (*aux function*) dir = FileNameJoin[{ #, "SystemFiles", "FrontEnd", "TextResources", $OperatingSystem /. "MacOSX" -...


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