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3

Use ExportString in place of Export, replace the start and end of each line to form POV lists, and then export to a text file. txt = ExportString[H, "Table", "FieldSeparators" -> ","]; pov = StringReplace[txt, {StartOfLine -> "<", EndOfLine -> ">"}]; Export["lists.pov", pov, "...


3

I never used LaTex, so I decided to play with this for a while and use latexbase.com to verify the output. This is not a full solution. It works for the the provided template. Here is what it does: Allows modification of color for all text, backgroud of header row, background of first column and alternating background for subsequent columns. A \definecolor ...


3

To include an eol, try this: Export["test.txt", "a\n", "Text"]


3

Try using ToBoundaryMesh like so: Needs["NDSolve`FEM`"]; Needs["OpenCascadeLink`"] imReg = ImplicitRegion[x^2 + y^2 - z < 0, {{x, -2, 2}, {y, -2, 2}, {z, 0, 5}}]; bmesh = ToBoundaryMesh[imReg]; bmesh["Wireframe"] shape = OpenCascadeShape[bmesh] OpenCascadeShapeExport["~/shape.stp", shape] The shape can now be read ...


2

Update 2 This is a better implementation of the parts function that does not assume that the spacings are the same. It finds groups of rows in the image that are not composed of entirely white pixels and splits by those groups. ClearAll@parts parts[image_] := Module[{width, height, imageData}, {width, height} = ImageDimensions@image; imageData = ...


2

PDB files often contain no bond information at all, and when they do they don't contain bond types Perceiving bond types from 3D geometry is a relatively expensive operation, which is fine for small molecules (<100 atoms) but really time-consuming for large proteins The PDB importer for the "Molecule" import element does not do bond-order ...


2

When you ask for a big image you also need to specify a high raster resolution. Like so: eq = HoldForm[μ = (Subscript[μ, max] s^n)/(Subscript[k, s] + s^n)]; With[{size = 600}, Rasterize[TraditionalForm[eq], RasterSize -> size, ImageSize -> size]]


2

Update Using the provided files. Since the Excel files have no header, importing as a Dataset is not possible. The easiest way is to add headers to the Excel file and use the code from the comments. If that is not possible then classGrades = Import["~/Downloads/GG.xlsx"] // First // MapAt[Round, #, {All, 1}] & // (* Change class id to ...


1

use ToString and " " enclose the text. And insert blank "\ " or "\n" when we need some format. text = ToString[α + a // HoldForm // TeXForm] <> "\ " <> "a,b,c" <> "\ " <> "A+B+C"; Export["new.txt", text, "Text"] Import["new.txt"] ...


1

Replace := by = and define a new f. Clear["`*"]; f[x_, t_] = 1/Sqrt[Cosh[r]]*((m ω)/(π h))^(1/4)* Exp[-((m ω)/(2 h))*x^2 - Conjugate[α]/ 2 (α + Conjugate[α] E^(I ϕ)*Tanh[r]) - I*ω*t - (m ω)/h E^(I ϕ) Tanh[r]* E^(-2*I*ω*t)* x^2 + (α + Conjugate[α] E^(I ϕ) Tanh[r])* E^(-I*ω*t)*Sqrt[(2 m ω)/h] x - ...


1

You can use Put (>>) and Get (<<). mydata>>filename mydataImported = <<filename


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For those that want to avoid mouse clicks at the expense of possibly more keypresses, postfixing //TableForm//TextCell//CopyToClipboard can be a quick fix as well: {{1, 2}, {3, 4}, {5,6}} //TableForm//TextCell//CopyToClipboard This avoids the need of selecting the output, right-clicking, and choosing "Copy As" > "Plain Text".


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