15

find the year that MMA functions were introduced via programmatic calls You can use, as an example WolframLanguageData["DSolve", "DateIntroduced"] So it is a matter of just running the above over all the commands you want. The above returns a DateObject See Looping through all functions defined in Mathematica for example of looping ...


4

In Mathematica Version 12.1 there is a really elegant way of listing all the Wolfram Language Experimental Symbols and having a convenient link to each ones documentation. Unfortunately it's dependent on the new entity framework and online connectivity apparently. Hyperlink @@@ EntityValue[EntityClass["WolframLanguageSymbol", "Experimental"], ...


4

The easiest way is probably to use a set of property sheets. I posted a set here on GitHub that you can try out.


3

As suggested in the comments and elaborated in my answer 223465, you can use a triangle mesh and symmetrize the PeriodicBoundaryCondition by making the following workflow: Create Triangle Mesh Here we use ToElementMesh to create a triangle mesh with refinement on the boundaries. Needs["NDSolve`FEM`"] Ω = Rectangle[{0, 0}, {2, 1}]; (* Create ...


3

The same idea for guide pages guideNotebooks = {$InstallationDirectory, "Documentation", $Language, "System", "Guides"} // FileNameJoin // FileNames["*.nb", #] &; guideLinks = guideNotebooks // Map[<|"Guide Pages" -> Hyperlink[#, "paclet:guide/" ~~ #] & @ FileBaseName[#]|> &] // Sort // Dataset (* Searchable *) Manipulate[ ...


2

Figured it out. I needed to hit the Select Paclet Name & Path button and then select the top folder containing my paclet.


2

Introduced is when the function was first written into the Mathematica function library. Updated is the last time the function has been changed. The introduced section is useful for users to know if their current version has access to that function. The updated section is mostly useful to let users know that the function will work differently between version ...


2

In Mathematica, many functions have what are called options. In the documentation there is a section below the function definitions called "Details and Options" that explains the valid options for a function. Options are as the name suggests, optional parameters that can be given to a function. These control anything from formatting the output, to ...


2

y=Interpolation[{{x1,y1},{x2,y2},....}] returns an interpolation object which gives y[x]


2

How can I get the usage statement and store it in a new variables? var = Information[foo]["Usage"]


2

My "solution" is, finally, the following. Do not waste your time trying to get Mathematica WSTP working with Visual Studio 2019. It does not work. ( Sadly, nobody proved otherwise. ) I installed Microsoft Visual Studio 11 2012(!) which lines up with the documentation provided with Mathemathica 12.1, and, as expected, I was able to produce addtwo....


1

Although file placements in Microsoft directories is ill advised to some here, it is what the Wolfram Documentation recommends. Sadly the current Wolfram Documentation (12.1.1) is not on par with Visual Studio 2019. For Visual Studio 2019: The wstp.h file MUST be placed in C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio\2019\Enterprise\VC\Auxiliary\VS\include ...


1

I think you analysis is correct - this is a typo in the documentation and I have updated the documentation. Sorry for the the trouble and thanks for reporting this. You always have the option to report things like this to support AT wolfram.com. I may not see all issues I am responsible for if posted here.


1

I think mathworld.wolfram.com is not part of the official documentation and that there are placeholders at that site.


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