19

The old documentation center used to have index pages for things like tech notes, but that seems to be absent in version 12.1. But until they reappear... "Tech note" in 12.1 is not so much a first-class concept as it is a qualifier applied to tutorials. Tutorial types are identified by a certain style of Cell in the notebook that holds each documentation ...


15

find the year that MMA functions were introduced via programmatic calls You can use, as an example WolframLanguageData["DSolve", "DateIntroduced"] So it is a matter of just running the above over all the commands you want. The above returns a DateObject See Looping through all functions defined in Mathematica for example of looping ...


12

The "How to" page Get Help in the Wolfram System is a good start. The links on that page lead to in-depth articles (with videos) about both interactive and programmatic ways to learn about Wolfram Language features.


11

This is not very scientific, but here is one option. Converting this to an idiomatic Wolfram Language solution is left as an exercise to the reader :). cd /Applications/Wolfram\ Desktop.app/Contents/Documentation/English/System/Tutorials grep "TECH NOTE" *.nb | cut -f 1 -d : A little experimentation shows that just typing the filename, such as ...


7

The situation with FinancialData has been discussed in some detail on https://community.wolfram.com/groups/-/m/t/1847045. In a nutshell: data availability has indeed been affected as a result of changes in our data providers. Documentation will more accurately reflect the current capabilities of FinancialData[] in the upcoming 12.1 release of the Wolfram ...


5

Fractions are always representable with a finite length continued fractions. Any number can be represented via an infinite continued fraction expansion. But inbetween those two extremes there are some numbers (more specifically the irrational solutions of quadratic equations), which after some initial digits exhibit a periodic continued fraction. This ...


4

In Mathematica Version 12.1 there is a really elegant way of listing all the Wolfram Language Experimental Symbols and having a convenient link to each ones documentation. Unfortunately it's dependent on the new entity framework and online connectivity apparently. Hyperlink @@@ EntityValue[EntityClass["WolframLanguageSymbol", "Experimental"], ...


4

Update: Using annotationArrow with LocatorPane to have multiple annotation arrows (use ALT+Click to create new locators or to remove existing ones): img = Import["https://i.stack.imgur.com/H0KML.png"] DynamicModule[{pt = {#, {0, 1} + #} & @(ImageDimensions[img]/2)}, LocatorPane[Dynamic[pt], Dynamic[Show[img, Graphics[{RGBColor[0, 2/3, 2/3], ...


3

The easiest way is probably to use a set of property sheets. I posted a set here on GitHub that you can try out.


3

As suggested in the comments and elaborated in my answer 223465, you can use a triangle mesh and symmetrize the PeriodicBoundaryCondition by making the following workflow: Create Triangle Mesh Here we use ToElementMesh to create a triangle mesh with refinement on the boundaries. Needs["NDSolve`FEM`"] Ω = Rectangle[{0, 0}, {2, 1}]; (* Create ...


3

The same idea for guide pages guideNotebooks = {$InstallationDirectory, "Documentation", $Language, "System", "Guides"} // FileNameJoin // FileNames["*.nb", #] &; guideLinks = guideNotebooks // Map[<|"Guide Pages" -> Hyperlink[#, "paclet:guide/" ~~ #] & @ FileBaseName[#]|> &] // Sort // Dataset (* Searchable *) Manipulate[ ...


3

Just want to note that LouisB's comment also works in textboxes: write some text, highlight the part you want to link, press Cmd + Shift + H (on Mac), and write paclet:ref/_ or paclet:tutorial/_. Easy! Thanks Louis! To complete the answer, let's incorporate @LouisB's commment: Evaluating Hyperlink["ClickHere", "paclet:ref/Set"] creates a link to ...


2

You can enter 5 10^6 as 5*^6 and save two characters, although I don't think that's really worthwhile or improves readability. Limit can be entered as Esc lim Escwith the limit in an underscript. Not sure whether you would consider that a shortcut.


2

Figured it out. I needed to hit the Select Paclet Name & Path button and then select the top folder containing my paclet.


2

My "solution" is, finally, the following. Do not waste your time trying to get Mathematica WSTP working with Visual Studio 2019. It does not work. ( Sadly, nobody proved otherwise. ) I installed Microsoft Visual Studio 11 2012(!) which lines up with the documentation provided with Mathemathica 12.1, and, as expected, I was able to produce addtwo....


2

In Mathematica, many functions have what are called options. In the documentation there is a section below the function definitions called "Details and Options" that explains the valid options for a function. Options are as the name suggests, optional parameters that can be given to a function. These control anything from formatting the output, to ...


2

y=Interpolation[{{x1,y1},{x2,y2},....}] returns an interpolation object which gives y[x]


1

Although file placements in Microsoft directories is ill advised to some here, it is what the Wolfram Documentation recommends. Sadly the current Wolfram Documentation (12.1.1) is not on par with Visual Studio 2019. For Visual Studio 2019: The wstp.h file MUST be placed in C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio\2019\Enterprise\VC\Auxiliary\VS\include ...


1

I think you analysis is correct - this is a typo in the documentation and I have updated the documentation. Sorry for the the trouble and thanks for reporting this. You always have the option to report things like this to support AT wolfram.com. I may not see all issues I am responsible for if posted here.


1

I think mathworld.wolfram.com is not part of the official documentation and that there are placeholders at that site.


1

Introduced is when the function was first written into the Mathematica function library. Updated is the last time the function has been changed. The introduced section is useful for users to know if their current version has access to that function. The updated section is mostly useful to let users know that the function will work differently between version ...


1

Why The why part is explained nicely in this answer by Szabolcs in a closely related Q/A: In 11.3 (and probably all the way back to at least 10.0), GraphPlot also takes Graph expressions as input. But it handles Graphs by converting them to a matrix (not a rule list!) first. Thus the vertex names are lost, and it will use vertex indices instead. A hidden ...


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