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Questions on writing non-trivial programs in Mathematica. Do not use this tag for questions on plotting/graphics or for questions on doing mathematics with Mathematica, where the focus is more on the math than the program.

11
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I agree with remarks of Leonid and acl - Mathematica is generally much better at performing large computations than are humans. I would add the caveat, though, that Mathematica can certainly miss spe …
answered Dec 3 '12 by Mark McClure
9
votes
There are now a couple of answers that show how to generate your tree in a very functional way. Really, though, your approach is not too bad so it might be worth seeing how to make minimal changes to …
answered Dec 23 '12 by Mark McClure
7
votes
Your tree can be described using a parametric L-system, as described in Prusinkiewicz and Lindenmayer's classic The Algorithmic Beauty of Plants. Here is a very short description of a Mathematica imp …
answered Dec 23 '12 by Mark McClure
7
votes
Many of the approaches here use image processing functions and they are blazing fast and very cool. However, there are advantages of a primitives based approach. When studying fractals, sometimes yo …
answered Mar 26 '13 by Mark McClure
15
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You can use Check to return an alternate result and use Quiet to avoid the messages that you are expecting anyway. Here's an example: Quiet[Table[Check[x /. FindRoot[x^2 - c, {x, 1}], "NaN", {Find …
answered Mar 21 '12 by Mark McClure