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I have some data representing a nested list, each element being composed of 3 real numbers like {{652.112, 0, 0.111838}, {664.096, 29.134, 0.0000485323}, {713.531, 12.1382, 0.805022} ...}. I would like to make an illustration for a journal article out of this list. The first idea is to use ListPlot3D function. The points in my list span in space from 600 to 1300 along $x$ (e.g. about 700 units along $x$) and from -100 to 100 along $y$ (e.g. about 200 units along $y$).

It is principally important for me that the illustration gives a correct feeling about the $x/y$ ratio. However, when I build it the image looks about equal along $x$ and along $y$. Changing AspectRatio->0.2 to 0.5 only helps partially, but disturbs another aspects of the image.

Is there a way to control the $x\text{–}y$ aspect ratio of a 3D image?

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  • $\begingroup$ Did you try BoxRatios? "BoxRatios->Automatic normally gives box ratios corresponding to the actual coordinate values in the 3D graphic." ~ Documentation Link: bit.ly/MKkJQp $\endgroup$ – Vitaliy Kaurov Aug 7 '12 at 9:22
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you. I did not yet. This solves my question. Best, Alexei $\endgroup$ – Alexei Boulbitch Aug 7 '12 at 9:41
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You need BoxRatios, it works also in ListPlot3D.

GraphicsRow[ Table[ Graphics3D[ Sphere[], BoxRatios -> a],
                    {a, {{1, 1, 1}, {2, 1, 1}, {1, 2, 1}, {1, 1, 2}}}]]

enter image description here

You can use it in ListPlot3D, e.g.

GraphicsRow[ Table[ ListPlot3D[Table[Sin[x y], {x, 0, 3, 0.1}, {y, 0, 3, 0.1}], 
                                                       BoxRatios -> {1, 1, 1/k}],                 
                   {k, 3}] ]

enter image description here

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Maybe something like this:

data = Transpose[{RandomReal[{600, 1300}, 100], 
    RandomReal[{-100, 100}, 100], RandomReal[{0, 1}, 100]}];

ListPlot3D[data, BoxRatios -> {700, 200, 100}]

enter image description here

Even better if you use:

ListPlot3D[data, BoxRatios -> {Automatic, Automatic, 100}]

In this way you control just the height of the box to find your ideal figure.

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