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I am completely new to Mathematica. Basically I was trying to write a code to plot a function and draw the approximate area by rectangles. To be more precise, plot a function f on an interval $[a,b]$, choose a step size $n$, divide the interval in n parts (so let's say $h=(b-a)/n$) and then draw the rectangles with coordinates $(a+ih,f(a+ih)),(a+(i+1)h, f(a+(i+1)h))$. I don't know how to store the information relative to the several rectangles. I would like to define a list or array (not sure how to call it) of rectangles parametrized by $i$, so something like:

For[i = 0, i < n, 
 R[i] = Rectangle[{a + i h, f[a + i h]}, {a + (i + 1) h,  f[a + (i + 1) h]}]]

which clearly doesn't work. I can't seem to find an appropriate way to do this.

I am attaching the code I wrote for a single rectangle, so if you also have any suggestion on how to improve that, it would be greatly appreciated. thank you!

f[x_] := x^2
a = 0
b = 2
n = 3

h = (b - a)/n
R = Rectangle[{a , f[a ]}, {a + h, f[a + h]}]]
r = Graphics[{ Opacity[0.2], Blue, R}]
Show[Plot[f[x], {x, a, b}], r ]

I would like to thank everyone for all of your answers!

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  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Use Epilog to display your rectangle along with your plot. For more than one rectangle, there's Table[]. Alternatively, use Graphics[r] instead of just r in your last line. $\endgroup$ May 6, 2015 at 3:43
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    $\begingroup$ You might also be interested in this MathWorld entry on Riemann sums, and in particular the associated Mathematica notebook. $\endgroup$ May 6, 2015 at 4:04

5 Answers 5

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f[x_] := x^2
With[
 {a = 0, b = 6, n = 7},
 rectangles = Table[
   {Opacity[0.05], EdgeForm[Gray], Rectangle[
     {a + i (b - a)/n, 0},
     {a + (i + 1) (b - a)/n, 
      Mean[{f[a + i (b - a)/n], f[a + (i + 1) (b - a)/n]}]}
     ]},
   {i, 0, n - 1, 1}
   ];
 Show[
  Plot[f[x], {x, a, b}, PlotStyle -> Thick, AxesOrigin -> {0, 0}],
  Graphics@rectangles
  ]
]

Mathematica graphics

Update:

I tried to combine @J. M.'s comment regarding the midpoint vs. "left-" or "right-"valued rectangles, and @belisarius 's fun idea of wrapping this in a Manipulate expression. Here's the outcome:

f[x_] := Sin[x]
Manipulate[
 rectangles = Table[
   {Opacity[0.05], EdgeForm[Gray], Rectangle[
     {a + i (b - a)/n, 0},
     {a + (i + 1) (b - a)/n, heightfunction[i]}
     ]},
   {i, 0, n - 1, 1}
   ];
 Show[{
   Plot[f[x], {x, a, b}, PlotStyle -> Thick, AxesOrigin -> {0, 0}],
   Graphics@rectangles
   },
  ImageSize -> Large
  ],
 {{a, 0}, -20, 20},
 {{b, 6}, -20, 20},
 {{n, 15}, 1, 40, 1},
 {{heightfunction, (Mean[{f[a + # (b - a)/n], 
       f[a + (# + 1) (b - a)/n]}] &)}, {
   (f[a + # (b - a)/n] &) -> "left",
   (Mean[{f[a + # (b - a)/n], f[a + (# + 1) (b - a)/n]}] &) -> "midpoint",
   (f[a + (# + 1) (b - a)/n] &) -> "right"
   }, ControlType -> SetterBar}
]

For instance, selecting the "right" version of the rectangles by choosing the "right" heightfunction gives the following output for $f(x)=\sin(x)$:

Animation shows three kinds of rectangles

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7
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ This would correspond to the "midpoint" Riemann sum. With some more work, one should also be able to produce "left" and "right" versions. $\endgroup$ May 6, 2015 at 4:53
  • $\begingroup$ @J.M. Good point. I interpreted the OP's question as asking about the construction of a Riemann integral, and in that context I naturally gravitated towards the midpoints. I also like @belisarius 's idea to provide a Manipulate to play with the parameters. I'll try to combine these two ideas. $\endgroup$
    – MarcoB
    May 6, 2015 at 4:57
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    $\begingroup$ Wonderful! Will upvote when I can do so again. $\endgroup$ May 6, 2015 at 6:01
  • $\begingroup$ @J.M. Thank you! That's high praise coming from you! $\endgroup$
    – MarcoB
    May 6, 2015 at 6:25
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @Gio The & and # are part of a "pure function" definition (see the documentation page for Function). For instance, a named function to calculate the square of a number could be square[x_] := x^2 (square[3] will output $9$). However, if you need a "throwaway" function to use only once, as I did in the example above, you can use a nameless "pure function" #^2 & . You can apply that function to an argument by writing #^2& [3] or #^2& @ 3. Either form would return $9$. Pure functions are powerful, and very convenient! $\endgroup$
    – MarcoB
    May 6, 2015 at 17:23
8
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Manipulate[
 Show[Plot[Sin[x], {x, 0, 2 Pi}], 
  DiscretePlot[Sin[t], {t, 0, 2 Pi, Pi/6}, ExtentSize -> p, 
   PlotMarkers -> {"Point", Large}, ColorFunction -> "Rainbow", 
   PlotStyle -> EdgeForm[Black]]], {p, {Left, Full, Right}}]

enter image description here

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5
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To draw a diagram that shows how a Riemann sum approximates a the area under a function, I would write something like this:

plotAreaApprox[f_, a_, b_, n_] :=
  Module[{h = (b - a)/n, rects},
    rects = 
      Table[Rectangle[{i, 0.}, {i + h, f[i + h/2]}], {i, a, b - h, h}];
    Plot[f[x], {x, a, b},
      Epilog -> {EdgeForm[Black], FaceForm[None], rects}]]

A function like this can be used to visualize theRiemann sums that approximate many simple integrals.

Example 1: using a named function

plotAreaApprox[Sin, 0., 2 N @ π, 10]

sin-plot

Example 2: using a pure function representing $2\, x/(1-x^2)$

plotAreaApprox[(2 #/(1 + #^2)) &, 0., 3, 10]

pure-func-plot

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2
  • $\begingroup$ For full flexibility, you could modify the snippet f[i + h/2] to yield the other Riemann sums. If I may also make a tiny suggestion, it looks better if the second argument of plotAreaApprox[] was an iterator; that is, plotAreaApprox[f_, {a_, b_, n_Integer}] := (* stuff *) $\endgroup$ May 6, 2015 at 5:10
  • $\begingroup$ @J.M. Your first suggestion is a good one, but I don't have the time now to implement it. Your second suggestion doesn't seem so good because the fourth arg isn't the step, so the last three args don't really form a iterator, and I don't see making the user add the brackets just to make look like an iterator. $\endgroup$
    – m_goldberg
    May 6, 2015 at 5:18
5
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I know there are already a lot of answers here, but I think you can extend it so that the function is changeable as well.

Manipulate[dx = (stop - start)/n;
 xi[i_] := 
  Which[Method == "Right", start + (i + 1)*dx, Method == "Left", 
   start + i*dx, Method == "Middle", start + dx/2 + dx i];
 rectangles = 
  Table[{Opacity[0.3], Green, EdgeForm[Gray], 
    Rectangle[{start + i*dx, 0}, {start + (i + 1)*dx, 
      Limit[func, x -> xi[i]]}]}, {i, 0, n - 1, 1}];
 Grid[{{Style[
     "\!\(\*SubscriptBox[\(\[Sum]\),     \
\(i\)]\)f(\!\(\*SubscriptBox[\(x\), \(i\)]\))\[CapitalDelta]x = " <> 
      ToString[N@Sum[dx*Limit[func, x -> xi[i]], {i, 0, n - 1}]] <> 
      "\n\[Integral]f(x)\[DifferentialD]x = " <> 
      ToString[Quiet@NIntegrate[func, {x, start, stop}]], 25]}, {Show[
     Plot[func, {x, start, stop}, PlotStyle -> {Black, Thick}], 
     Graphics@rectangles]}}], {{func, 2*x^3 + 5*x^2 + 3*x + 2, 
   "f(x)="}, 
  InputField[]}, {{start, 0, "\!\(\*SubscriptBox[\(x\), \(i\)]\)"}, 
  InputField[]}, {{stop, 10, "\!\(\*SubscriptBox[\(x\), \(f\)]\)"}, 
  InputField[]}, {{n, 20}, 3, 50, 1, 
  Appearance -> "Open"}, {{Method, "Left"}, {"Left", "Right", 
   "Middle"}, ControlType -> Setter}]

enter image description here

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4
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k = {a + # h, f[a + # h]} &;
Manipulate[h = (b - a)/n;
           Plot[f[x], {x, a, b}, PlotStyle -> Red,
               Prolog -> (Rectangle[k@#, k[# + 1]] & /@ Range[0, n - 1])],
 {n, 1, 10, 1}]

Mathematica graphics

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  • 1
    $\begingroup$ After looking at the picture, I believe one of the ordinates in the arguments of Rectangle[] has to be 0 to get the Riemann sum rectangles. $\endgroup$ May 6, 2015 at 4:46
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    $\begingroup$ Well... you are the first to mention the Riemann sum in this thread :-) $\endgroup$
    – LLlAMnYP
    May 6, 2015 at 4:53
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @LLlAMnYP, I have selfish reasons for keyword-dropping in SE sites like here and at math; the next time I search on Google, these pages should then show up among the results. $\endgroup$ May 6, 2015 at 4:57
  • $\begingroup$ @J.M., I have a sneaking suspicion, that you are not unfamiliar with SEO. I'll shut up now, before this page is overloaded with unwanted keywords. $\endgroup$
    – LLlAMnYP
    May 6, 2015 at 5:00
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @J.M. In that case this is a dup mathematica.stackexchange.com/a/58579/193 $\endgroup$ May 6, 2015 at 16:28

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