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This question already has an answer here:

I have two tables like:

nex1 = Table[l3*10^3/4*10^14, {l3, 1, 30, 1}];
nex2= Table[l4, {l4, 1, 30, 1}];

How can I plot nex1 versus nex2 so that nex1 is x axis and nex2 is y axis (not distinct plot of this tables in one plot).

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marked as duplicate by Sjoerd C. de Vries, gpap, Dr. belisarius plotting Dec 16 '14 at 13:03

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    $\begingroup$ Transpose[{nex1, nex2}]. $\endgroup$ – Kuba Dec 16 '14 at 7:11
  • $\begingroup$ @Kuba I wonder if there is a duplicate around. Although the question is easily answered, it might be quite useful for future beginners, so perhaps keeping it might be beneficial... $\endgroup$ – Yves Klett Dec 16 '14 at 7:53
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    $\begingroup$ @YvesKlett Don't know if suitable but it is for example here: Good MMA examples / Transpose and dimensions $\endgroup$ – Kuba Dec 16 '14 at 7:59
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    $\begingroup$ @YvesKlett a proper duplicate $\endgroup$ – Kuba Dec 16 '14 at 8:01
  • $\begingroup$ @Kuba good one! Cannot vote anymore though ;-) $\endgroup$ – Yves Klett Dec 16 '14 at 8:05
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You can merge the two tables in one single list of couples of points, by using a new Table function. Then you can plot the created list using ListPlot

nex1 = Table[l3*10^3/4*10^14, {l3, 1, 30, 1}];
nex2 = Table[l4, {l4, 1, 30, 1}];
Table[{nex1[[i]], nex2[[i]]}, {i, 1, 30}];
ListPlot[%]
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