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How can I export 3D Mathematica plots such that I can put them into a presentation and still being able to rotate them? Is there a specific format or does it depend on the program used to create the presentation?

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  • $\begingroup$ I have been able to create an auto-rotating gif but I'd like to be able to manipulate the plot at will $\endgroup$ – pugliam Dec 15 '14 at 2:11
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    $\begingroup$ Have you considered using a presentation notebook and doing the presentation with Mathematica? If you don't have Mathematica on the computer that you'll be doing the presentation on then you can CDF the presentation and use the CDF Player. $\endgroup$ – Edmund Dec 15 '14 at 2:54
  • $\begingroup$ Search the site for "VRML" and you'll get some hits $\endgroup$ – Dr. belisarius Dec 15 '14 at 2:56
  • $\begingroup$ Concerning VRML, I remember that long time ago I used Mathematica in combination with Cortona to have movable graphics in PowerPoint. $\endgroup$ – mikuszefski Dec 15 '14 at 13:53
  • $\begingroup$ I support Edmund's recommendation to use CDF. Once you get a presentation up, the sizes sets, and so forth, the presentations can be amazing. $\endgroup$ – David G. Stork Dec 16 '14 at 2:45
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Here is an answer to this question derived from its comments.

  • Currently there is no way to preserve the interactive capabilities of a 3D plot when using Export.
  • If it is not possible to do the presentation with Mathematica itself, perhaps by using its slideshow capability, the next best recourse is to put the 3D plot in a CDF document and present it with CDF Player. Finally you can embed the CDF document in a web page and display it within PowerPoint with full interactivity.
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