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Consider the following code to produce the sequence $x_1,\ldots,x_{n+1}$ where $x_i=11\cdots1$ ($i$ digits 1). Is there an easier way to do this?

n = 7
X = Table[Sum[10^i, {i, 0, k - 1}], {k, 1, n + 1}]
R = Table[Mod[X[[k]], n], {k, 1, n + 1}]
X 
R

Also, the code defines the list R of remainders on division of $x_i$ by $n$. The output of R is {1, 4, 6, 5, 2, 0, 1, 4}.

I'd like to do the following: determine the indexes producing the first two equal elements of R (for example, since R[[1]]=R[[7]] I'd like to do some math with X[[1]] and X[[7]]).

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  • $\begingroup$ Why are you using SetDelayed[]? $\endgroup$ May 31, 2014 at 0:08
  • $\begingroup$ @belisarius, sorry. I have no idea what you are talking. $\endgroup$
    – Sigur
    May 31, 2014 at 0:09
  • $\begingroup$ Why are you using := instead of =? $\endgroup$ May 31, 2014 at 0:09
  • $\begingroup$ Is it not the way to define something?! To store on a variable. $\endgroup$
    – Sigur
    May 31, 2014 at 0:10
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Then read this Q&A mathematica.stackexchange.com/questions/18393/… $\endgroup$ May 31, 2014 at 0:11

4 Answers 4

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r = {1, 4, 6, 5, 2, 0, 1, 4};

sol = Select[GatherBy[Range[Length@r], r[[#]] &], Length@# > 1 &, 1][[1,;;2]]
(* {1,7} *)

(Credit: @Szabolcs's answer in this Q/A)

or

sol2 = ## & @@@ Position[r, (Select[Gather[r], Length@# > 1 &, 1][[1, 1]]), 1, 2]

or

sol3 = ReplaceList[r, {a___, b : PatternSequence[i_, ___, i_], ___} :> 
                       Sequence[1 + Length[{a}], Length[{a}] + Length[{b}]], 1]

Update:

f[n_] := Module[{x = Table[Sum[10^i, {i, 0, k - 1}], {k, 1, n + 1}],  r, sol},
       r = Mod[x, n]; 
       sol =Select[GatherBy[Range[Length@r], r[[#]] &], Length@# > 1 &, 1][[1,;;2]]; 
       {x, r, sol, x[[sol[[2]]]] - x[[sol[[1]]]]}]

f[7]
(* {{1,11,111,1111,11111,111111,1111111,11111111},
    {1,4,6,5,2,0,1,4},
    {1,7},
    1111110} *)
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  • $\begingroup$ Very short code. Is it possible to save the result on sol for example, so I could use simply sol[[1]] to make use of 1? $\endgroup$
    – Sigur
    May 31, 2014 at 0:21
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @Sigur, with the updated version sol[[1]] gives 1 instead of {1}. $\endgroup$
    – kglr
    May 31, 2014 at 0:24
  • $\begingroup$ Please, could you try with n=2? I'm getting error Part specification 1[[-1]] is longer than depth of object. >>. $\endgroup$
    – Sigur
    May 31, 2014 at 0:30
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, perfect. Thanks so much. With your help I can illustrate the fact that any natural $n$ has a multiple written using only 1 or 0. $\endgroup$
    – Sigur
    May 31, 2014 at 0:48
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @Sigur, pls see the update. $\endgroup$
    – kglr
    May 31, 2014 at 2:43
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n = 7;

{X, R} = Table[(10^x - 1)/9, {x, 1, n+1}] // {#, Mod[#, n]} &;

X

R

matchPairs = Subsets[Range@Length@R, {2}][[First@Position[Subsets[R, {2}], {x_, x_}]]]

(*

{1, 11, 111, 1111, 11111, 111111, 1111111, 11111111}
{1, 4, 6, 5, 2,0, 1, 4}

{{1,7}}

*)

Just take First@matchPairs to get first only of any pairs of indices that have same value for remainder.

BTW - bad idea to use uppercase symbols/initials - you can clash with built-ins...

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  • $\begingroup$ Nice! In this case, to use the number 1 from the output {{1,7}} I have to use matchPairs[[1,1]], right? Is it possible to save so that I simply use it as matchPairs[[1]]? $\endgroup$
    – Sigur
    May 31, 2014 at 0:19
  • $\begingroup$ @Sigur: As I said, just add First@ in front of the Subsets..., and you'll get the first match only, whereby you can address them as desired. $\endgroup$
    – ciao
    May 31, 2014 at 0:37
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list = {1, 4, 6, 5, 2, 0, 1, 4};

pos = FirstCase[{a_, b_, ___} :> {a, b}] @ PositionIndex @ # &;

pos @ list

{1, 7}

pos @ {0, 0}

{1, 2}

pos @ {1, 3, 3, 3, 3} 

{2, 3}

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1
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Using Catch, Throw and Do:

r = {1, 4, 6, 5, 2, 0, 1, 4};

Catch[Do[Do[If[#[[i]] === #[[j]], Throw[{i, j}]];, {j, i + 1, 
Length[#]}];, {i, 1, Length[#] - 1}]] &@r

(*{1, 7}*)
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