4
$\begingroup$

Could you suggest any Mathematica packages that are used for General relativity calculations? Id like to write code to solve the Schwarzchild Lagrangian equation.

$\endgroup$
4
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I think you will get better answer on this from google. I typed General relativity package mathematica and google gave many hits. I know xAct is good package for tensor calculus. You can also check integrating-hamiltons-equations-for-the-schwarzschild-metric and plotting-animating-a-test-planet-around-a-star $\endgroup$
    – Nasser
    Aug 30, 2023 at 12:35
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ btw, just saying help me to write the code to solve Schwarzchild Lagrangian equation ? is not really a good question for this forum. It might be good question to give to chatGPT though. $\endgroup$
    – Nasser
    Aug 30, 2023 at 12:37
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Dear Rishabh! Welcome to Mathematica StackExchange. Here we provide support to your faulty code instead of providing a full code in itself for a given problem. The thing you need to do is to first try to come up with your own code first, if you are stuck or getting any errors, you can definitely ask the community to help you out ! $\endgroup$
    – codebpr
    Aug 30, 2023 at 13:17
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I am not really sure what you want to do: solve geodesics equations for the Schwarzschild metric numerically? That does not really require GR specific methods apart from computing Christoffel symbols which one could just plug in from literature: for the Schwarzschild metric there are on,y a few quite simple ones. $\endgroup$
    – N0va
    Aug 30, 2023 at 13:34

1 Answer 1

6
$\begingroup$

I just would like to point out some approaches, of a quite broad spectrum, that are used wrt to General Relativity with Wolfram Language. This is a collection of works - some are packages, some use packages, some are research papers. Most of it I am aware about through a lot of editorial work at https://wolfr.am/PubMat and https://wolfr.am/StaffPicks

FRESH RESEARCH:

Examples of the Wolfram Physics Project:

$\endgroup$
0

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.