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I was looking at some sample code in a YouTube video and saw an "operator" (not sure this is the right term) consisting of a horizontal bar with circles on the ends. I searched through the Wolfram docs and have not been able to find it.

enter image description here

Can someone enlighten me?

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    $\begingroup$ Try: g = Table[RandomInteger[5] \[UndirectedEdge] RandomInteger[5], {7}] and Graph[g, VertexLabels -> "Name"] $\endgroup$
    – Syed
    Feb 20, 2022 at 4:12
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    $\begingroup$ Btw., you can simply highlight any symbol and press F1 to get directly to the documentation page of that symbol. $\endgroup$ Feb 20, 2022 at 7:32
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    $\begingroup$ @HenrikSchumacher I don't think that works on YouTube $\endgroup$
    – mikado
    Feb 20, 2022 at 11:35
  • $\begingroup$ Ahaha. Yes, you're right! Should have read the post in more detail. =D $\endgroup$ Feb 20, 2022 at 12:03

1 Answer 1

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It's StandardForm of UndirectedEdge. It's also mentioned in e.g. document of Graph.

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    $\begingroup$ Worth adding: you can enter this symbol by typing Esc ue Esc (and Esc de Esc for directed edge). $\endgroup$ Feb 20, 2022 at 13:18

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