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I want to find $a,b \in \mathbb{C}$ such that $$|1-2a-2b| < 1 \quad \text{&} \quad |1-2a+2b| < 1$$ using mathematica. I tried to use Solve[{Abs[1 - 2 a - 2 b] < 1, Abs[1 - 2 a + 2 b] < 1}, {a, b}] but it never finishes the evaluation. How do I proceed?

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    $\begingroup$ with FindInstance[Abs[1 - 2 a - 2 b] < 1 && Abs[1 - 2 a + 2 b] < 1, {a, b}] one get `{{a -> 45/128 - (15 I)/32, b -> 0}}´. $\endgroup$
    – rmw
    Jan 7 at 14:32
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Clear["Global`*"]

ineq = {Abs[1 - 2 a - 2 b] < 1, Abs[1 - 2 a + 2 b] < 1};

As recommended by Daniel Huber, define intermediate variables

eq = {c == a + b, d == a - b};

The inequalities are equivalent to

sol = Reduce[Join[ineq, eq], {c, d}, {a, b}] /. (eq /. Equal -> Rule)

(* 0 < Re[a + b] < 1 && -Sqrt[Re[a + b] - Re[a + b]^2] < Im[a + b] < Sqrt[
  Re[a + b] - Re[a + b]^2] && 
 0 < Re[a - b] < 1 && -Sqrt[Re[a - b] - Re[a - b]^2] < Im[a - b] < Sqrt[
  Re[a - b] - Re[a - b]^2] *)

As recommended by rmw, use FindInstance to get specific examples,

(ex = FindInstance[sol, {a, b}, Complexes, 5]) // Column

enter image description here

Verifying that ex satisfy ineq

And @@ (And @@ ineq /. ex)

(* True *)
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  • $\begingroup$ Why should Mathematica not be able to handle the original equations. It is understood that making the substitutions simplifies things somewhat, but Mathematica cannot see that? $\endgroup$
    – mjw
    Jan 7 at 22:03
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    $\begingroup$ @mjw - Whether Mathematica "should" be able to solve any given problem is subjective. However, you can anticipate that you will encounter problems that it cannot directly solve. Many indirect approaches or workarounds are available. $\endgroup$
    – Bob Hanlon
    Jan 8 at 0:08
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You may simplify the equations by setting:

c= a+b
d= a-b

Then we get the following equations:

eq={Abs[1 - 2 c] < 1, Abs[1 - 2 d] < 1}

that can be solved by Reduce

Reduce[eq, {c, d}]

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ Even better: Abs[1-2c]<1 is the circle in the complex plane centered at 1 with radius 1/2, and similarly for Abs[1-2d]<1. $\endgroup$ Jan 8 at 8:39
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Reduce[{Abs[1 - 2 a - 2 b] < 1, 
    Abs[1 - 2 a + 2 b] < 1} /. {a -> x + I*y, b -> u + I*v} // 
  ComplexExpand, {x, y, u, v}, Reals]

The result is too long.

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For comparison, here is a human calculation. Let $z_1=2a+2b$ and $z_2=2a-2b.$ NOT CODE Then $|z_k-1|<1$ for $k=1,2.$ Thus, $$z_k=1+r_k(\cos \theta_k +i \sin \theta_k)$$ for $0\le r_k <1$ and $0 \le \theta < 2\pi.$ Consequently, $a= \frac{1}{4} (z_1+z_2)$ and $b= \frac{1}{4} (z_1-z_2).$

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A picture says more than thousand words ...

Manipulate[
 RegionPlot[
Evaluate@ComplexExpand[{Abs[1 - 2 a - 2 b] < 1, 
  Abs[1 - 2 a + 2 b] < 1} /. {a -> a1 + I*a2, 
  b -> b1 + I*b2}], {b1, -5, 5}, {b2, -5, 5}, 
Epilog -> {Red, PointSize[Large], Point[{a1, a2}]}, 
GridLines -> Automatic], {a1, -4, 4, 
Appearance -> "Labeled"}, {a2, -4, 4, Appearance -> "Labeled"}
]

enter image description here

The intersection of both circles is the solution.

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