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Consider these simple exampes of two overlapping lines:

RegionIntersection[Line[{{0, 0}, {2, 0}}], Line[{{1 , 0}, {2, 0}}]]
(*Line[{{1, 0}, {2, 0}}]*)
RegionIntersection[Line[{{0, 0}, {2, 0}}], Line[{{1 , 0}, {3, 0}}]]
(*Line[{{{1, 0}, {2, 0}}}]*)

In both examples Mathematica evaluates the intersection as expected. Surprisingly in the second example with extra curly brackets .

My questions: What's the reason for this behavior? How to avoid or remove the outer curly brackets?

Thanks

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    $\begingroup$ The second answer is also semantically correct, Line can represent a collection of lines. If you want to drop the extra list wrapper you can rewrite this specific case: Line[{{{1, 0}, {2, 0}}}] /. Line[{l_List}] :> Line[l] $\rightarrow$ (* Line[{{1, 0}, {2, 0}}] *). This doesn't modify the first result. $\endgroup$
    – kirma
    May 30, 2020 at 11:14
  • $\begingroup$ @kirma Thanks for your answer! $\endgroup$ May 30, 2020 at 11:18

1 Answer 1

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Turning my comment into an answer since I guess it's really a sufficient solution to the task at hand...

The second answer is also semantically correct, Line can represent a collection of lines. If you want to drop the extra list wrapper you can rewrite this specific case:

Line[{{{1, 0}, {2, 0}}}] /. Line[{l_List}] :> Line[l]

Line[{{1, 0}, {2, 0}}]

This doesn't modify the first result.

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