5
$\begingroup$

I am trying to export around 10000 plots from Mathematica in order to compile them into an animation with another program. Using the following, where "frames" is the list of plots

Export["001.jpg", frames, "VideoFrames"]

works, but is exporting at a rate of about 1 frame per second. Is there a faster way to accomplish this? Thanks!

$\endgroup$

closed as off-topic by C. E., Henrik Schumacher, Alexey Popkov, m_goldberg, MarcoB Feb 11 at 0:52

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question cannot be answered without additional information. Questions on problems in code must describe the specific problem and include valid code to reproduce it. Any data used for programming examples should be embedded in the question or code to generate the (fake) data must be included." – C. E., Henrik Schumacher, Alexey Popkov, m_goldberg, MarcoB
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 3
    $\begingroup$ You could try to export into a lossless format. Mathematica's image compression tools are not among the best. I am also not sure whether exporting all frames into a single file is a good idea with jpg format. Maybe tiff works better. Should frames be a vector graphic, it might also be an option to export into a vector graphics format such as pdf or svg (the svg exporter tends to be a bit buggy, though) and to rasterize the images externally (e.g. with ffmpeg; it can rasterize at least svg; ffmpeg can merge the files into a single video). $\endgroup$ – Henrik Schumacher Feb 9 at 10:40
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ However, vector graphics will be very slow for images with color gradients or with many polygons and lines. You may also try to Rasterize the images first which gives you a bit more of control. Make sure to be informed about the various options of Rasterize and Export (note that each export format may have its own extra options). $\endgroup$ – Henrik Schumacher Feb 9 at 10:44
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Since almost nothing is known about the actual plots, it is very hard to give a more precise answer. $\endgroup$ – Henrik Schumacher Feb 9 at 10:45
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks so much! $\endgroup$ – user413587 Feb 9 at 20:30
  • $\begingroup$ You're welcome! Did it help? $\endgroup$ – Henrik Schumacher Feb 9 at 20:31