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I want to solve this eq'

$$((1 - t) r)/(1 - x) = \log[\exp[(r t )/x] + 1 - \exp[r]$$

without success, I tried to get a specific numeric solution

NSolve[-(0.25/(1 - x)) == Log[1. + 0.606531 (-0.5 + x)], {x}]

The output is the same line I wrote

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    $\begingroup$ NSolve[-(0.25/(1 - x)) == Log[1. + 0.606531 (-0.5 + x)], {x}, Reals] $\endgroup$ – Moo Jan 1 '19 at 17:49
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NSolve[-0.25/(1 - x) == Log[1. + 0.606531 (-0.5 + x)], x, Reals]

(*

{{x -> 0.100092}, {x -> 1.51936}}

*)

enter image description here

Even

Solve[-0.25/(1. - x) == Log[1. + 0.606531 (-0.5 + x)], x, Reals]

works.

| improve this answer | |
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For the transcendental equations FindRoot is a better choice.

FindRoot[-(0.25/(1 - x)) == Log[1. + 0.606531 (-0.5 + x)], {x, 1.5}]

(* {x -> 1.51936}  *)

FindRoot[-(0.25/(1 - x)) == Log[1. + 0.606531 (-0.5 + x)], {x, 0.5}]

(*  {x -> 0.100092}  *)

Have fun!

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  • $\begingroup$ Why is FindRoot "a better choice" than NSolve or Solve? $\endgroup$ – David G. Stork Jan 1 '19 at 18:38
  • $\begingroup$ And how did you know to seed the solutions at 1.5 and at .5? $\endgroup$ – David G. Stork Jan 1 '19 at 19:03
  • $\begingroup$ @ David G. Stork If a transcendental equation has an exact solution Solve is the best choice, that's evident. If not, one can either use NSolve or FindRoot. I remember that years ago there was a discussion on this and the general opinion was that in this case, FindRoot is better. I, however, never tried to find out why is it so. $\endgroup$ – Alexei Boulbitch Jan 1 '19 at 19:14
  • $\begingroup$ @David G. Stork To address your second question. I know it from the plot published in your answer. I did not discuss it, since it is rather evident. $\endgroup$ – Alexei Boulbitch Jan 1 '19 at 19:16

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