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Motivation:

I don't normally print or save as PDF notebooks, but when I do, it's annoying to see that some plots exceded the page width as defined in the print configurations. It would be nice to see in the notebook a mark, probably a line, even if roughly defining the page width.

Question:

What options does Wolfram Mathematica provide to allow the user to be aware of the print/PDF page width while working?

It would be desirable to have a style or environment that clearly marks the end of the printable region with a line.

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1. Printout environment

1.1 window menu

In the notebook menu "Format", sub-menu "Screen Environment", it's possible to choose a "Printout" environment. There is no line indicating the edge, but thing exceeding the width will not appear.

enter image description here

1.2 programmatically

Programmatically users can use the option PrintingStyleEnvironment or ScreenStyleEnvironment.

2 Ruler

As pointed out by @Hugh, It may help to show the ruler. From the documentation.

The ruler is a toolbar used to set the text margins of selected cells and the indentation of cell names and keywords. The notebook ruler can be added to a notebook by selecting Show Ruler in the Window menu or programmatically by using the notebook option WindowToolbars.

2.1 window menu

enter image description here

2.2 programmatically

SetOptions[SelectedNotebook[], WindowToolbars -> {"RulerBar"}] (* ON *)

SetOptions[SelectedNotebook[], WindowToolbars -> {}] (* OFF *)

I'm not aware of a way to explicitly show a line marking the end of the printable region in the page itself. Other answers are most welcomed.

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    $\begingroup$ Also go to the Window tab and put up a Toolbar with a ruler. The ruler has tabs indicating the page width. $\endgroup$ – Hugh May 18 '18 at 16:23

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