25
$\begingroup$

Yesterday I got into an argument with @UnchartedWorks over in the comment thread here. At first glance, he posted a duplicate of Marius' answer, but with some unnecessary memoization:

unitize[x_] := unitize[x] = Unitize[x]
pick[xs_, sel_, patt_] := pick[xs] = Pick[xs, sel, patt]

and proposed the following test to justify his claim that his approach is faster:

RandomSeed[1];
n = -1;
data = RandomChoice[Range[0, 10], {10^8, 3}];

AbsoluteTiming[Pick[data, Unitize@data[[All, n]], 1] // Length]

AbsoluteTiming[pick[data, unitize@data[[All, n]], 1] // Length]

(*
{7.3081, 90913401}
{5.87919, 90913401}
*)

A significant difference. Naturally, I was skeptical. The evaluation queue for his pick is (I believe) as follows:

  1. pick is inert, so evaluate the arguments.
  2. data is just a list, 1 is inert, data[[All, n]] quickly evaluates to a list
  3. unitize@data[[All, n]] writes a large DownValue...
  4. ...calling Unitize@data[[All, n]] in the process, returning the unitized list.
  5. Another large DownValue of the form pick[data] = *pickedList* is created (data here is, of course, meant in its evaluated form), never to be called again (unless, for some reason, we explicitly type pick[data]).
  6. The *pickedList* is returned.

What about the evaluation queue for Pick[data, Unitize@data[[All, n]], 1]?

  1. Pick is inert.
  2. data becomes an inert list, 1 is inert, data[[All, n]] quickly evaluates to an inert list.
  3. Nothing happens here.
  4. Unitize@data[[All, n]] returns the unitized list.
  5. Nothing happens here either.
  6. The same step as before is taken to get us the picked list.

So, clearly pick has more things to do than Pick.

To test this out I run the following code:

Quit[]

$HistoryLength = 0;

Table[
  Clear[pick, unitize, data];
  unitize[x_] := unitize[x] = Unitize[x];
  pick[xs_, sel_, patt_] := pick[xs] = Pick[xs, sel, patt];
  data = RandomChoice[Range[0, 10], {i*10^7, 3}];
 {Pick[data, Unitize@data[[All, -1]], 1]; // AbsoluteTiming // First,
  pick[data, unitize@data[[All, -1]], 1]; // AbsoluteTiming // First},
  {i, 5}]

Much to my surprise, pick is consistently faster!

{{0.482837, 0.456147},
 {1.0301,   0.90521},
 {1.46596,  1.35519},
 {1.95202,  1.8664},
 {2.4317,   2.37112}}

How can I protect myself from black magic make a representative test? Or should I embrace the black magic is this real and a valid way to speed things up?

Update re: answer by Szabolcs

Reversing the order of the list like so:

{pick[data, unitize@data[[All, -1]], 1]; // AbsoluteTiming // First,
 Pick[data, Unitize@data[[All, -1]], 1]; // AbsoluteTiming // First}

gave me the following result:

{{0.466251, 0.497084},
 {1.18016,  1.17495},
 {1.34997,  1.42752},
 {1.80211,  1.93181},
 {2.25766,  2.39347}}

Once again, regardless of order of operations, pick is faster. Caching could be suspect, and as mentioned in the comment thread of the other question, I did try throwing in a ClearSystemCache[] between the pick and Pick, but that didn't change anything.

Szabolcs suggested that I throw out the memoization and just use wrapper functions. I presume, he meant this:

unitize[x_] := Unitize[x];
pick[xs_, sel_, patt_] := Pick[xs, sel, patt];

As before, on a fresh kernel I set history length to 0 and run the Table loop. I get this:

{{0.472934, 0.473249},
 {0.954632, 0.96373},
 {1.42848,  1.43364},
 {1.91283,  1.90989},
 {2.37743,  2.40031}}

i.e. nearly equal results, sometimes one is faster, sometimes the other (left column is pick, right is Pick). The functions perform as well as Pick in a fresh kernel.

I try again with the memoization as described towards the beginning of the answer:

{{0.454302, 0.473273},
 {0.93477,  0.947996},
 {1.35026,  1.4196},
 {1.79587,  1.90001},
 {2.24727, 2.38676}}

The memoized pick and unitize perform consistently better out of a fresh kernel. Of course, it uses twice the memory along the way.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Have you tried removing the "memoization" part and simply using wrapper functions? $\endgroup$ – Szabolcs May 5 '17 at 10:25
  • $\begingroup$ @szabolcs excellent suggestion. No, I have not. I'll report back in the next hour or so. $\endgroup$ – LLlAMnYP May 5 '17 at 10:35
  • $\begingroup$ @Szabolcs I tried it out, wrappers are essentially not different from built-ins. $\endgroup$ – LLlAMnYP May 5 '17 at 12:28
  • $\begingroup$ @Szabolcs also, I tried to put SeedRandom[42] right after the Clear statement, so that I could repeatedly have Pick act on the same data. I don't witness the speedup from your answer. $\endgroup$ – LLlAMnYP May 5 '17 at 12:34
18
$\begingroup$

Cause of speed up

This is definitely not memoization. The reason for the observed speed up is that for large arrays (e.g. 10^8 elements), the memory clean up operations may take noticeable time. If one doesn't free memory, one can perform some operations a bit faster.

Here is a simple example:

Let's create a large array, then perform a calculation, and remove the array:

AbsoluteTiming[
    Total[ConstantArray[0, 10^8]];
]

{0.422509, Null}

It takes 0.42 seconds. Let's now do the same thing, but keep the array in memory:

AbsoluteTiming[
    Total[garbage = ConstantArray[0, 10^8]];
]

{0.366755, Null}

This evaluation is a bit faster.

Let's check how long does it take to remove the large array:

AbsoluteTiming[
    Remove[garbage]
]

{0.061982, Null}

Note that 0.06 seconds is the difference of the calculation times above. This example shows that if we keep the large array instead of removing it, our code can run faster, because we don't need to spent time on freeing memory.

Your example

In the example you provide, removing the result of Unitize@data[[All, n]] from memory takes some time. If one saves this array in a redundant variable, one avoids immediate memory clean-up and the evaluation seems to be faster. In case of pseudo-memoization the Clear[pick, unitize] command will take extra time to free the memory, but this command is placed outside the AbsoluteTiming[] scope. That is why "memoization" seems to speed up the calculation.

How to make a representative test?

You should put Clear[pick, unitize] inside your timing function. This test will show that the pseudo-memoization technique is actually slower than built-in functions:

Table[
    Clear[data];
    data=RandomInteger[{0,10},{i*10^7,3}];
    {
        Pick[data,Unitize@data[[All,-1]],1]; // AbsoluteTiming // First
        ,
        Clear[pick,unitize];
        unitize[x_]:=unitize[x]=Unitize[x];
        pick[xs_,sel_,patt_]:=pick[xs,sel,patt]=Pick[xs,sel,patt];
        pick[data,unitize@data[[All,-1]],1]; // AbsoluteTiming // First
    },
    {i,5}]

(*
{{0.534744, 0.469538},
{1.03776, 1.05842},
{1.58536, 1.65404},
{2.10422, 2.11284},
{2.48129, 2.71405}}
*)

Technical note: as noted by Carl Woll in comments, if one wants to measure the symbol-removing-time using the following code:

In[1] := garbage = ConstantArray[0, 10^8];
In[2] := AbsoluteTiming[Remove[garbage]]

one should set $HistoryLength to zero, otherwise the Out[1] variable will retain the contents of the large array. If Out[1] retains the large data, Remove[garbage] will only delete the reference, but not the data itself. Deletion time of a reference is almost zero, but it doesn't correspond to the deletion time for large data.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Brilliant! Upvote and likely candidate for accept. Must go now, probably will be on mobile till next Wednesday. $\endgroup$ – LLlAMnYP May 5 '17 at 14:34
  • $\begingroup$ Not really. unitize is still faster. i.stack.imgur.com/LAuI0.png $\endgroup$ – UnchartedWorks May 5 '17 at 14:54
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ However, I do find that strange. This is a packed array, doesn't garage collection amount to removing an entry like "memory from a to b is allocated"? I'd expect that to be an O(1) operation. $\endgroup$ – LLlAMnYP May 5 '17 at 14:55
  • 5
    $\begingroup$ @UnchartedWorks The problem in your screenshot is that Out[9] still has the contents of garbage, so Remove[garbage] doesn't cause the allocated memory to get recovered. Try using $HistoryLength=0 and repeat your experiment. Shadowray's comment is another way to avoid sticking the contents of garbage into Out. $\endgroup$ – Carl Woll May 5 '17 at 15:44
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ @LLlAMnYP Timing may not include time for system calls like free. See this answer. $\endgroup$ – Shadowray May 17 '17 at 8:23
12
$\begingroup$

You are absolutely correct that this memoization is completely unnecessary.

What seems to happens is that from the second run onwards on the same data, the builtin functions become faster. I do not understand why (perhaps some internal caching), but it does show that it has absolutely nothing to do with the memoization:

In[38]:= AbsoluteTiming[Pick[data, Unitize@data[[All, n]], 1] // Length]
AbsoluteTiming[Pick[data, Unitize@data[[All, n]], 1] // Length]
AbsoluteTiming[Pick[data, Unitize@data[[All, n]], 1] // Length]

Out[38]= {10.6117, 90909421}

Out[39]= {8.08706, 90909421}

Out[40]= {7.96311, 90909421}

Another comment:

RandomSeed is an option, not a function. It should be SeedRandom, otherwise it does nothing.

$\endgroup$
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ @Shadowray and Szabolcs, I did suspect caching, but couldn't "fix" this behavior with a ClearSystemCache[]. Even though pick calls Pick internally, the order of operations does not seem to change much: please see my update. +1 for the above example, but no accept :) $\endgroup$ – LLlAMnYP May 5 '17 at 8:20
  • $\begingroup$ Yeah, RandomSeed is my mistake. $\endgroup$ – UnchartedWorks May 5 '17 at 8:48
4
$\begingroup$

I can't reproduce claimed speedup on "11.0.1 for Linux x86 (64-bit) (September 21, 2016)".

In my tests, custom function wrappers without memoization (as suggested by Szabolcs) consistently add overhead of about 1 µs, functions with memoization add 2-3 µs overhead, compared to built-ins. This overhead is measurable only for small lists, for larger lists it's completely negligible.

Important thing is that results of AbsoluteTiming are very volatile with median deviation from minimal value, for larger lists, from few to ten percent. I'm sure there are better ways to measure this volatility, I used median deviation just to have any estimate.

Code used for timings:

$HistoryLength = 0;

minDev // ClearAll
minDev // Attributes = HoldFirst;
minDev[expr_, n_Integer?Positive] := Module[{res, min},
  res = Table[expr, n];
  min = Min@res;
  {min, Median[res - min]}
]

testBuiltin@data_ := (
  ClearSystemCache[];
  Pick[data, Unitize@data, 1] // AbsoluteTiming // First
)
testCustom@data_ := (
  ClearSystemCache[];
  ClearAll[unitize, pick];
  unitize[x_] := Unitize[x];
  pick[xs_, sel_, patt_] := Pick[xs, sel, patt];
  pick[data, unitize@data, 1] // AbsoluteTiming // First
)
testMemo@data_ := (
  ClearSystemCache[];
  ClearAll[unitize, pick];
  unitize[x_] := unitize[x] = Unitize[x];
  pick[xs_, sel_, patt_] := pick[xs] = Pick[xs, sel, patt];
  pick[data, unitize@data, 1] // AbsoluteTiming // First
)

testAll[k_, n_] := 
  With[{data = (SeedRandom[1]; RandomChoice[Range[0, 10], k])},
    minDev[#@data, n] & /@ {testMemo, testCustom, testBuiltin}
  ]
format = TableForm@Map[
  NumberForm[#, ExponentFunction -> (Null &)] &, 
  SetAccuracy[#, Min[Accuracy@SetPrecision[Min@#, 2], 7]],
  {-1}
] &;

First argument of testAll is size of used data, second is number of repeated timings. First column of result is minimal absolute timing, second is median deviation from this minimal value. First rows are results for memoized custom pick and unitize, second rows are results for non-memoized custom functions, third rows are for built-in Pick and Unitize.

testAll[10^1, 10^5]//format
(* 0.000004 0.*10^(-7)
   0.000002 0.000001
   0.000001 0.000001 *)

testAll[10^2, 10^5]//format
(* 0.000005 0.000001
   0.000003 0.000001
   0.000002 0.000001 *)

testAll[10^3, 10^5]//format
(* 0.000015 0.000001
   0.000014 0.*10^(-7)
   0.000013 0.000001 *)

testAll[10^4, 10^5]//format
(* 0.000124 0.000002
   0.000122 0.000002
   0.000121 0.000001 *)

testAll[10^5, 10^4]//format
(* 0.001297 0.000093
   0.001296 0.000069
   0.001295 0.000103 *)

testAll[10^6, 10^3]//format
(* 0.0201   0.0014
   0.0201   0.0011
   0.0201   0.0012 *)

testAll[10^7, 10^2]//format
(* 0.2004   0.0148
   0.2003   0.0099
   0.2004   0.0088 *)

testAll[5 10^7, 2 10^1]//format
(* 0.972    0.021
   0.974    0.017
   0.973    0.022 *)

Fresh kernel

To make sure that we're not using any Mathematica's internal cache, that might not be cleared by ClearSystemCache, we can launch separate kernel for each test using:

freshKernelEvaluate // ClearAll
freshKernelEvaluate // Attributes = HoldAll;
freshKernelEvaluate@expr_ := Module[{link, result},
  link = LinkLaunch[First@$CommandLine <> " -mathlink -noprompt"];
  LinkWrite[link, Unevaluated@EvaluatePacket@expr];
  result = LinkRead@link;
  LinkClose@link;
  Replace[result, ReturnPacket@x_ :> x]
]

Timings of built-ins:

resBuiltin = Table[
  freshKernelEvaluate[
    SeedRandom@1;
    data = RandomChoice[Range[0, 10], 5 10^7];
    Pick[data, Unitize@data, 1] // AbsoluteTiming // First
  ],
  100
]

{1.28392, 1.23527, 1.25863, 1.23625, 1.33601, 1.24361, 1.26809, 1.23502, 1.34473, 1.23813, 1.24654, 1.23617, 1.27127, 1.25661, 1.22674, 1.58978, 1.26939, 1.37024, 1.24581, 1.54075, 1.23516, 1.23805, 1.3053, 1.40044, 1.42726, 1.39822, 1.46109, 1.27038, 1.39617, 1.2588, 1.29047, 1.23082, 1.25069, 1.34985, 1.27281, 1.24016, 1.2642, 1.2511, 1.23745, 1.27978, 1.24066, 1.38282, 1.32234, 1.30623, 1.26118, 1.58021, 1.27522, 1.24706, 1.27051, 1.2493, 1.24819, 1.28184, 1.46254, 1.24269, 1.26356, 1.24011, 1.35468, 1.27491, 1.35288, 1.24462, 1.27119, 1.26811, 1.23685, 1.33249, 1.23138, 1.29139, 1.23725, 1.28638, 1.23906, 1.27579, 1.3872, 1.31602, 1.29556, 1.26464, 1.27076, 1.24602, 1.25735, 1.24667, 1.27297, 1.23757, 1.34311, 1.26616, 1.35083, 1.24861, 1.23788, 1.25357, 1.24262, 1.28117, 1.25753, 1.28231, 1.23406, 1.27971, 1.22885, 1.27199, 1.24191, 1.23346, 1.26387, 1.24803, 1.27653, 1.23953}

Timings of memoized custom functions:

resMemo = Table[
  freshKernelEvaluate[
    SeedRandom@1;
    data = RandomChoice[Range[0, 10], 5 10^7];
    unitize[x_] := unitize[x] = Unitize[x];
    pick[xs_, sel_, patt_] := pick[xs] = Pick[xs, sel, patt];
    pick[data, unitize@data, 1] // AbsoluteTiming // First
  ],
  100
]

{1.35284, 1.23307, 1.27167, 1.23678, 1.27437, 1.25009, 1.27847, 1.2418, 1.23227, 1.39655, 1.26371, 1.26179, 1.27424, 1.27965, 1.236, 1.28489, 1.25988, 1.26318, 1.24007, 1.24381, 1.2672, 1.25462, 1.26703, 1.24123, 1.28868, 1.24192, 1.27177, 1.23488, 1.23468, 1.27525, 1.26571, 1.27287, 1.23757, 1.26981, 1.25737, 1.2729, 1.23705, 1.24429, 1.26927, 1.23292, 1.28266, 1.23352, 1.28423, 1.23743, 1.26883, 1.23515, 1.27272, 1.25892, 1.23213, 1.23746, 1.3435, 1.27545, 1.23472, 1.49113, 1.42916, 1.56421, 1.5238, 1.37695, 1.27734, 1.23146, 1.2388, 1.24054, 1.27661, 1.23467, 1.43818, 1.51605, 1.28172, 1.24674, 1.34043, 1.36447, 1.28034, 1.23788, 1.3027, 1.25299, 1.26136, 1.24514, 1.23405, 1.26157, 1.24994, 1.27737, 1.23637, 1.26785, 1.411, 1.24163, 1.2301, 1.29223, 1.25492, 1.25177, 1.26862, 1.25825, 1.23715, 1.25327, 1.2694, 1.6624, 1.24317, 1.26682, 1.27915, 1.25705, 1.23258, 1.25804}

I don't see any consistent difference, distribution of results seems similar:

res = <|"Built-in" -> resBuiltin, "Memo" -> resMemo|>;
ListPlot[res, PlotRange -> All]
Histogram[res, PlotRange -> All, ChartStyle -> {Blue, Orange}, ChartLegends -> Automatic]

ListPlot and Histogram data vector

Edit

UnchartedWorks writes in a comment that unitize is enough to show difference in speed and pick is not necessary. Carl Woll points out that data matrix should be used instead of data vector.

After changing above I see a difference between memoized and built-in version. Memoized function is consistently slower than built-in.

Used test functions:

testBuiltin = freshKernelEvaluate[
  $HistoryLength = 0;
  SeedRandom@1;
  data = RandomChoice[Range[0, 10], {#, 3}];
  Pick[data, Unitize@data[[All, -1]], 1] // AbsoluteTiming // First
] &;
testCustom = freshKernelEvaluate[
  $HistoryLength = 0;
  SeedRandom@1;
  data = RandomChoice[Range[0, 10], {#, 3}];
  unitize[x_] := Unitize[x];
  Pick[data, unitize@data[[All, -1]], 1] // AbsoluteTiming // First
] &;
testMemo = freshKernelEvaluate[
  $HistoryLength = 0;
  SeedRandom@1;
  data = RandomChoice[Range[0, 10], {#, 3}];
  unitize[x_] := unitize[x] = Unitize[x];
  Pick[data, unitize@data[[All, -1]], 1] // AbsoluteTiming // First
] &;

Timings:

SetDirectory@NotebookDirectory[];
s = OpenWrite@"results.dat";
k = 3 10^7;
Do[
  Write[s, 
    If[OddQ@i,
      {testBuiltin@k, testCustom@k, testMemo@k}, 
      Reverse@{testMemo@k, testCustom@k, testBuiltin@k}
    ]
  ],
  {i, 10^2}
] // AbsoluteTiming
file = Close@s;
(* {898.653, Null} *)

Result analysis:

results = AssociationThread[{"Built-in", "Custom", "Memo"} -> Transpose@ReadList@file]
colors = {Blue, Orange, Darker@Green};
ListPlot[results, PlotRange -> All, PlotStyle -> colors]
Histogram[results, PlotRange -> All, ChartStyle -> colors, ChartLegends -> Automatic]

<|"Built-in" -> {1.22985, 1.22461, 1.23061, 1.23184, 1.2402, 1.22937, 1.25221, 1.21342, 1.23612, 1.22765, 1.23061, 1.23409, 1.25464, 1.21786, 1.23144, 1.24461, 1.24803, 1.24498, 1.24818, 1.23294, 1.2348, 1.51256, 1.51016, 1.46498, 1.48277, 1.49113, 1.38432, 1.23417, 1.23139, 1.23475, 1.23356, 1.22846, 1.23629, 1.25202, 1.23593, 1.24975, 1.22473, 1.23137, 1.2266, 1.25627, 1.21828, 1.2525, 1.23725, 1.24693, 1.24163, 1.23324, 1.28597, 1.23083, 1.22618, 1.23927, 1.22844, 1.23095, 1.21823, 1.23546, 1.23057, 1.22338, 1.22514, 1.23199, 1.23086, 1.21832, 1.22947, 1.22668, 1.2302, 1.24527, 1.23862, 1.48311, 1.48445, 1.47365, 1.24457, 1.25607, 1.26731, 1.22819, 1.23567, 1.23589, 1.27261, 1.22645, 1.22554, 1.23832, 1.22731, 1.2334, 1.25166, 1.26591, 1.22114, 1.24653, 1.22359, 1.22788, 1.22567, 1.25535, 1.23223, 1.24091, 1.24912, 1.23169, 1.23663, 1.23177, 1.2278, 1.55135, 1.4796, 1.49146, 1.49611, 1.23101}, "Custom" -> {1.23652, 1.23587, 1.23412, 1.22896, 1.22707, 1.23646, 1.25783, 1.26341, 1.24158, 1.22581, 1.22999, 1.24083, 1.23376, 1.23851, 1.24782, 1.22384, 1.2431, 1.23661, 1.23801, 1.24318, 1.23982, 1.53433, 1.48343, 1.54463, 1.48097, 1.47601, 1.23676, 1.24323, 1.2311, 1.22642, 1.23351, 1.23296, 1.23254, 1.23407, 1.23169, 1.24395, 1.24042, 1.24769, 1.23167, 1.21756, 1.2301, 1.23421, 1.24282, 1.23704, 1.23525, 1.2351, 1.25029, 1.23524, 1.22839, 1.22839, 1.23667, 1.26583, 1.22544, 1.22955, 1.22292, 1.22819, 1.27443, 1.24958, 1.24789, 1.22195, 1.21883, 1.22279, 1.21813, 1.22052, 1.23921, 1.5044, 1.49484, 1.50915, 1.23095, 1.23694, 1.22373, 1.24806, 1.22945, 1.24085, 1.23373, 1.22282, 1.2362, 1.23099, 1.23932, 1.24258, 1.25047, 1.26868, 1.23042, 1.22579, 1.2229, 1.23243, 1.2368, 1.22925, 1.2387, 1.23014, 1.21772, 1.2259, 1.22549, 1.23208, 1.26501, 1.33781, 1.48822, 1.48658, 1.25979, 1.26228}, "Memo" -> {1.29497, 1.29798, 1.29918, 1.29907, 1.31014, 1.29503, 1.29095, 1.3249, 1.29036, 1.30051, 1.2789, 1.29959, 1.2988, 1.2882, 1.29519, 1.28946, 1.31952, 1.32948, 1.32447, 1.29627, 1.31841, 1.5721, 1.57097, 1.55392, 1.56358, 1.55974, 1.28744, 1.3029, 1.28567, 1.2914, 1.29167, 1.29062, 1.29471, 1.29797, 1.30193, 1.30423, 1.30097, 1.29706, 1.29027, 1.29005, 1.29543, 1.2929, 1.29996, 1.29386, 1.29502, 1.31621, 1.31506, 1.29105, 1.30462, 1.28348, 1.30922, 1.28715, 1.30386, 1.29361, 1.29596, 1.30149, 1.28943, 1.29833, 1.31909, 1.2911, 1.31163, 1.28986, 1.29063, 1.28847, 1.29451, 1.46695, 1.55118, 1.55433, 1.29779, 1.29201, 1.29947, 1.29045, 1.28494, 1.29003, 1.29385, 1.2856, 1.31603, 1.33432, 1.28929, 1.29873, 1.29259, 1.28694, 1.28868, 1.28838, 1.29824, 1.29435, 1.29401, 1.30137, 1.2971, 1.29248, 1.29333, 1.2847, 1.28666, 1.28647, 1.29923, 1.30116, 1.56112, 1.56282, 1.29155, 1.2936}|>

ListPlot and Histogram data matrix

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ testMemo@data_ := (ClearSystemCache[]; ClearAll[unitize, pick]; unitize[x_] := unitize[x] = Unitize[x]; (pick[xs_,sel_,patt_]:=pick[xs]=Pick[xs,sel,patt];) Pick[data, unitize@data, 1] // AbsoluteTiming // First) $\endgroup$ – UnchartedWorks May 5 '17 at 18:58
  • $\begingroup$ If you only run Pick once and then Clear all of definitions, pick is not necessary, and you can use Pick instead. You will see that testMemo is the fastest. $\endgroup$ – UnchartedWorks May 5 '17 at 19:01
  • $\begingroup$ @jkuczm Could you, please, measure this time $HistoryLength = 0; garbage = ConstantArray[0, 10^8]; AbsoluteTiming[Remove[garbage]] on your system? $\endgroup$ – Shadowray May 6 '17 at 13:55
  • $\begingroup$ @Shadowray I get {0.033196, Null}. $\endgroup$ – jkuczm May 6 '17 at 14:13
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ You are using a vector RandomChoice[Range[0, 10], k] as data, while everybody else is using a matrix, e.g., RandomChoice[Range[0, 10], {k, 3}] as data. $\endgroup$ – Carl Woll May 6 '17 at 15:41
1
$\begingroup$

What if let pick and unitize run before Pick and Unitize? pick is still faster than Pick. In:

Clear[unitize, pick, n, data]
SeedRandom[1];
n = -1;
data = RandomChoice[Range[0, 10], {10^8, 6}];

unitize[x_] := unitize[x] = Unitize[x];
pick[xs_, sel_, patt_] := pick[xs, sel, patt] = Pick[xs, sel, patt]
AbsoluteTiming[
 pick[data, unitize@data[[All, n]], 1] // Length]
AbsoluteTiming[Pick[data, Unitize@data[[All, n]], 1] // Length]

Out:

{4.71476, 90911166}
{5.14919, 90911166}

Memoization

This technical is Memoization. I learned it from Haskell.

Memoization in GHC’s interactive environment.(GHC=Glasgow Haskell Compiler) enter image description here

The first execution time of add1 x is 0.73 seconds and the memory usage is 676MB memory, the second execution time of add1 x is 0.08 seconds, and the memory usage is only 86KB.

If you use this technique wisely, it can save a lot of CPU time and memory. In some worse scenarios, it might only save CPU time and use too much memory.

$\endgroup$
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ I appreciate your joining this thread, but this really doesn't answer the "why". I'd rather like to know where you learned of this technique. $\endgroup$ – LLlAMnYP May 5 '17 at 9:26
  • $\begingroup$ @LLlAMnYP I have to add a screenshot and explain it briefly, So I answered your question in my answer. $\endgroup$ – UnchartedWorks May 5 '17 at 11:57
  • $\begingroup$ "This technical is Memoization. I learned it from Haskell." There is obviously no memoization happening due to your code, because it is only run once. $\endgroup$ – Szabolcs May 5 '17 at 12:08
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @Szabolcs I'm not a Haskell user, but I guess there is. Correct me if I'm wrong, but let x = (sum [1..2^22]) stores that basically as an expression, but as soon as add1 x is run, the machine is forced to actually go and calculate this sum. After this it now remembers, that x = 8796095119360. However we know that MMA does not work like that. $\endgroup$ – LLlAMnYP May 5 '17 at 12:11
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ @LLlAMnYP I was talking about the Mathematica code, not the Haskell screenshot, which is irrelevant here. The answer to your question about why it is faster seemed to be "it's just memoization". This is not correct. $\endgroup$ – Szabolcs May 5 '17 at 12:13

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.