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Floating Bar Chart from Google

Does anyone know how to make floating bar charts in Mathematica v11.0? I can't seem to find any similar thread or related documentation. I'd like to make a simple one like the one above.

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  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Just because you can do this doesn't mean you should. If you're wanting to show both a "trend over time" and some measure of spread, then using vertical lines allows a more accurate comparison especially if you have many more than 4 bars. (At least you're using bars rather than elephants or bunny rabbits.) $\endgroup$ – JimB Jan 30 '17 at 2:25
  • $\begingroup$ closely related Q/A: How to create a stacked BarChart with custom bar origins as function? $\endgroup$ – kglr Aug 18 '17 at 14:32
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A quick and dirty approach would be to trick BarChart into plotting two datasets, one of which is represented by transparent empty bars; this will be combined with ChartLayout -> "Stacked":

BarChart[
 {{2, 3}, {4, 6}, {2, 7}},
 ChartLayout -> "Stacked",
 ChartStyle -> {Directive[FaceForm[], EdgeForm[]], Red}
]

Mathematica graphics

The data is presented as a list of intervals; each value in the interval representing the starting value and the height of the bar, respectively.

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  • $\begingroup$ Very sneaky and yet elegant, MarcoB. Thank you! $\endgroup$ – drc7af Jan 31 '17 at 2:43
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Update: The function Charting`RangeBarChart does not allow multiple data sets. To deal with multiple data sets, we can use a transformation of the data and define a custom ChartElementFunction to modify the rectangles:

ClearAll[ceF, trnsfrmF]
ceF[cedf_: "GlassRectangle", o : OptionsPattern[]] :=
  Module[{origin = Charting`ChartStyleInformation["BarOrigin"], box = #},
   Switch[origin, Bottom, box[[2, 1]] = #3[[1]], Top, box[[2, 2]] = -#3[[1]], 
     Left, box[[1, 1]] = #3[[1]], Right, box[[1, 2]] = -#3[[1]]]; 
   ChartElementDataFunction[cedf, o][box, ##2]] &

trnsfrmF = #2 -> # & @@@ # &;

data = {{2, 3}, {4, 7}, {2, 6}, {8, 10}};

BarChart[{trnsfrmF @ data, trnsfrmF @ (1 + data)}, 
 ChartStyle -> 1,
 ChartElementFunction -> ceF["FadingRectangle"],
 ChartLabels -> {{"Group1", "Group2"}, {"A", "B", "C", "D"}}]

Mathematica graphics

Row[BarChart[{trnsfrmF@data, trnsfrmF@(1 + data)}, ChartStyle -> 1, ImageSize -> 200,
    PlotLabel -> Style["BarOrigin -> " <> ToString[#], 12, "Panel"],
    ChartElementFunction -> ceF["FadingRectangle"],
    ChartLabels -> {{"Group1", "Group2"}, {"A", "B", "C", "D"}}, 
    BarOrigin -> #] & /@ {Bottom, Top, Left, Right}, Spacer[30]]

Mathematica graphics

Original post:

The undocumented function Charting`RangeBarChart does exactly what is required:

Charting`RangeBarChart[{{2, 3}, {4, 7}, {2, 6}, {8,10}},   
 ChartElementFunction -> "GlassRectangle", ChartStyle -> 1, 
 ChartLabels -> {"A", "B", "C", "D"}] 

Mathematica graphics

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