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I want to solve this system but I can't

Solve[(1 - x^2) (-W - 3 x + Sqrt[6] Sqrt[z])
   == 
   -W^4 x (-1 + x^2) y +
   3 W y (W^3 (-1 + x^2) (-1 + Sqrt[1 - x^2] y) - 
   6 Sqrt[6] (y + Sqrt[1 - x^2] (-1 + z))^2 Sqrt[z] + 
   W^3 (-1 + x^2) z) 
   == 
   9 Sqrt[6] (y + Sqrt[1 - x^2] (-1 + z))^2 (1 - 2 z) Sqrt[z] 
   -1/3 W^3 (-1 + x^2) z (Sqrt[6] W x 
   - 9 (-1 + Sqrt[1 - x^2] y + z)) 
   ==
   3 W (W^3 (-1 + x^2) (-1 + Sqrt[1 - x^2] y) - 
   6 Sqrt[6] (y + Sqrt[1 - x^2] (-1 + z))^2 Sqrt[z] + 
   W^3 (-1 + x^2) z)
   == 0, {x, y, z, W}]
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  • $\begingroup$ it does not appear to be a system ie a list of equations but a single expression with consecutive Equal signs.Consider breaking up the successive equalities into their corresponding parts ie transform x==y==z into {x==y,y==z,x==z} $\endgroup$
    – user42582
    Commented Oct 26, 2016 at 7:59
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    $\begingroup$ @user42582 That's not a problem. It's valid syntax. (BTW it can be expanded using LogicalExpand.) I believe that reason why Solve is so slow that after eliminating all the square roots it ends up with a high order polynomial system of equations with complicated coefficients. It is simply too slow to work with such large expressions. This also means that the solution would look uselessly complicated, so it's not worth computing the exact symbolic result. $\endgroup$
    – Szabolcs
    Commented Oct 26, 2016 at 8:52
  • $\begingroup$ Evidence for this is also the high memory usage of the kernel when evaluating this Solve. On my machine it keeps hovering around 1 GB (going up and down) after running for a couple of minutes. $\endgroup$
    – Szabolcs
    Commented Oct 26, 2016 at 8:54
  • $\begingroup$ @Szabolcs you are right , when run this code about all of my RAM and a large part of my CPU used. I am waiting for about 1 hour with any result. $\endgroup$
    – milad
    Commented Oct 26, 2016 at 9:55
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    $\begingroup$ I suggest you use NSolve. It also took a long time but it finished and found 967 solutions. I don't know if this solution set is exhaustive. $\endgroup$
    – Szabolcs
    Commented Oct 26, 2016 at 10:10

1 Answer 1

1
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Making use ofFindRoot instead of Solve, one obtains by

FindRoot[{sys}, {{x, 0.1} , {y, 0.1}, {z, 0.1}, {W,0.1}}]

{x -> 0.57735, y -> 0.100001, z -> 0.5, W -> 9.21509*10^(-18)}.

Addition. Subsituting W->2 in the system and NSolving it in $x,y,z$, one obtains

NSolve::infsolns: Infinite solution set has dimension at least 1. Returning intersection of solutions with -((121484 x)/178835)-(113492 y)/178835+(171802 z)/178835 == 1.

and

{{x -> 1., y -> -2.64617, z -> 0.}, {x -> -1., y -> -0.505331, z -> 0.}, {x -> -1., y -> 0., z -> 0.33382}, {x -> -1., y -> 0., z -> 0.33382}, {x -> -1., y -> 0., z -> 0.33382}, {x -> 1., y -> 0., z -> 1.74805}, {x -> 1., y -> 0., z -> 1.74805}, {x -> 1., y -> 0., z -> 1.74805}}

Addition 2. By the changes Sqrt[z]==s and Sqrt[1-x^2]==t the system under consideration can be reduced to a polynomial system over Q(Sqrt[6]). The reduced system can be solved in terms of higher degree polynomials via Groebner on powerful comp. It is clear that solution would be huge and useless. I find it monkey business.

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  • $\begingroup$ There are at least 6 real solutions of the system under consideration. $\endgroup$
    – user64494
    Commented Oct 26, 2016 at 10:27
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks, The "Find Root" find one solution but I think this system have more answers $\endgroup$
    – milad
    Commented Oct 26, 2016 at 11:07
  • $\begingroup$ @ milad : Do you really need all the ones? $\endgroup$
    – user64494
    Commented Oct 26, 2016 at 11:10
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, I am studying dynamical system of a model in cosmology and I must check all answers for investigate this model is good or no $\endgroup$
    – milad
    Commented Oct 26, 2016 at 11:34
  • $\begingroup$ @ milad : Then how about the case when the solution set is infinite? $\endgroup$
    – user64494
    Commented Oct 26, 2016 at 11:37

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