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I have a question about subscript policy. For some reason I have some variables called Subscript[q, 1], Subscript[q, 2], Subscript[q, 3] and Subscript[q, 4]. I know that I could have called them in other ways, but even (not only) for them to be more human readable I decided to call them this way. Now I have the expression

Series[Sin[q Subscript[q, 3]], {q, 0, 0}]

which is not evaluated as I want. To cricumvent this I wrote

Series[Sin[q q3], {q, 0, 0}]/.{q3->Subscript[q, 3]}

which works, but is not elegant. Is that an elegant way to make Mathematica understand that in this case the subscript is just the name of a variable?

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    $\begingroup$ No, I don't think so. Some use the "Notation`" package. Or perhaps Subscript["q", 3]? One particular problem is that the q is the same variable in both factors of q Subscript[q, 3]; the other is that Subscript[q, 3] is treated as a function of q, which you cannot avoid. Since you're willing to type q3, you could try something like Format[q3] = Subscript["q", 3], especially if output formatting is the goal; see also MakeBoxes[]. $\endgroup$
    – Michael E2
    Sep 20, 2016 at 10:41
  • $\begingroup$ Both versions of your command result in the same result for me (O[q]^1). Do you have an example where the results differ and you can say which you want? $\endgroup$
    – Chris K
    Sep 20, 2016 at 13:25
  • $\begingroup$ Concerning subscripts, I added the same issue. I know use the "Notation" package. It runs event it is quite long to define all my variables like this. $\endgroup$
    – Bendesarts
    Sep 20, 2016 at 14:45

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