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I wanted to visualise at how the frequency spectrum of square waves changes with duty. But I got stuck at the first hurdle:

FourierTransform[SquareWave[x], x, w]

Doesn't evaluate. Why not? Can I make it do so?

I tried a couple of other things, like If[Sin[x]>0,1,0] but they don't work. I would have thought the built in square wave would have worked.

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closed as off-topic by Wjx, m_goldberg, Feyre, Young, QuantumDot Sep 6 '16 at 10:23

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One way to investigate the spectrum of the SquareWave and other periodic functions is via the FourierSeries. Here are the first few coefficients:

FourierSeries[SquareWave[x], x, 10, FourierParameters -> {1, 2 Pi}]

If you want to see real values, then use FourierSinSeries and FourierCosSeries.

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    $\begingroup$ The Fourier transform of an infinite periodic function is not an easy function to visualize: it's a series of weighted delta functions. The weights themselves are more illuminating, and FourierSeries gives you those. $\endgroup$ – John Doty Sep 5 '16 at 13:56
  • $\begingroup$ That's a very useful suggestion. $\endgroup$ – Lucas Sep 5 '16 at 17:09

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