14
$\begingroup$

The (toy-example) dataset plots consists of 12 rows, the first two of which are shown below:

Mathematica graphics

I want to arrange the plots shown in the plot column into a grid, where the rows correspond to values of the color and suit variables, and the columns correspond to the values of the elf variable.

More specifically, the rows should be grouped into two "superrows", one for each value of the color variable, in the order {"red", "black"}, and the rows within each superrow should correspond to the values of the suit variable, ordered alphabetically.

I've only managed to achieve a simple grid, where the rows are neither grouped nor ordered:

Mathematica graphics

Here's the code that does it:

grid = plots[GroupBy["suit"], GroupBy[KeyDrop[#, "suit"], Key["elf"], Function[x, First[x][["plot"]]]] &];

(I'd be embarrassed to admit how many hours it took me to conquer this molehill.)


My questions are:

  1. How can I create the superrows?
  2. How can I display the labels of the rows and superrows as two hierarchical header columns along the left?
  3. How can I order the two levels as described above?

FWIW, below is the code that generates the plots dataset.

makeDataset[columns_, columnLabels_] := Module[{labeledColumns, records},
   labeledColumns = AssociationThread[columnLabels, columns];
   records = Transpose[labeledColumns, AllowedHeads -> All];
   Dataset[records]
];

preplots = Module[{points, data, base, columns, columnNames, validCombinationPattern, validRows},
   points = Flatten[Table[Table[Chop[{Sin[m (u + 2)], Sin[n u]}], {u, 0, 4 \[Pi], 0.1}],
                          {n, 4}, {m, 3}], 1];
   data = Map[makeDataset[Transpose[#], {"x", "y"}] &, points];

   base = <|"suit" -> {"Spades", "Hearts", "Diamonds", "Clubs"},
            "color" -> {"Black", "Red"},
            "elf" -> {"Snap", "Crackle", "Pop"}|>;

   validCombinationPattern = {"Spades" | "Clubs", "Black", _} | {"Hearts" | "Diamonds", "Red", _};
   validRows = Cases[Tuples[Values[base]], validCombinationPattern];
   columns = Append[Transpose[validRows], data];
   columnNames = Append[Keys[base], "data"];

   makeDataset[columns, columnNames]
];

doPlot[dataset_] := ListPlot[dataset[["data"]], AspectRatio -> 1, Frame -> True, FrameTicks -> None];
plots = preplots[All, KeyDrop[Append[#, "plot" -> doPlot[#]], "data"] &];

Update

Here's the seed of an idea regarding the problem (mentioned by WReach) of the repeated column headers.

One can use the part spec [[All, Values]] on the 2nd-level datasets to effectively suppress the column headers:

Mathematica graphics

The code for that is the following modification of WReach's pipeline:

plots[
  GroupBy[{#color&, #suit&, #elf& -> (#plot&)}] /* KeySortBy[<|"Red"->1,"Black"->2|>]
, KeySort /* KeyMap[Pane[#, 50] &] /* (Dataset[#][[All, Values]] &)
, KeySort
, First
]

(Actually, for the figure shown, I had to use a width of 70 rather than 50 for the suit header. YMMV.)

What I still have not figured out how to do is to apply this modification selectively to all but the first superrow.


Lingering minor gripe: the 2 levels | 2 rows, &c. schmutz at the bottom of the dataframes is an unwelcome distraction. I wish one could suppress it somehow. To WRI: This ... levels | ... rows information is of interest only for debugging; once the dataset's structure is as it should be, and its contents are clearly displayed, one couldn't care less about the ... levels | ... rows information. Please add "remove levels/rows annotation from default Dataset display" to the wishlist for 10.5.

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ An unofficial (and unsupported) way to suppress the summary bar at the bottom of a dataset visualization is Block[{Dataset`$DatasetSummaryBarEnabled = False}, Print@mydataset]. Note the use of Print to force box generation while the global variable is set. If you never want to see the summary boxes ever, you can simply set the global value of the variable by direct assignment instead of using Block. Also, beware that this variable must be set after the Dataset` package has been loaded. $\endgroup$ – WReach May 25 '16 at 22:29
  • $\begingroup$ @WReach: many thanks for the tip! $\endgroup$ – kjo May 26 '16 at 1:15
15
$\begingroup$

Update - Version 11

In version 11, The Dataset visualizer handles triply-nested associations quite nicely:

plots[
  GroupBy[{#color&, #suit&, #elf& -> (#plot&)}] /* KeySortBy[<|"Red"->1, "Black"->2|>]
, KeySort
, KeySort
, First
]

triply-nested dataset screenshot


Original Response

The Dataset visualizer does not presently (v10.4.1) support a nice layout for triply-nested associations. However, we can get close by nesting datasets:

plots[
  GroupBy[{#color&, #suit&, #elf& -> (#plot&)}] /* KeySortBy[<|"Red"->1,"Black"->2|>]
, KeySort /* Dataset
, KeySort
, First
]

triply-nested association dataset screenshot

KeySort and KeySortBy are used at each association level to order the keys.

This rendition is not perfect, but has the virtue of being achievable with relatively simple code. We can get better alignment of the columns by using Pane to fix the width of the suit row headers:

plots[
  GroupBy[{#color&, #suit&, #elf& -> (#plot&)}] /* KeySortBy[<|"Red"->1,"Black"->2|>]
, KeySort /* KeyMap[Pane[#, 50]&] /* Dataset
, KeySort
, First
]

dataset with columns aligned

The repeated headers are harder to fix. It requires, for example, creating a new visualization from scratch using Grid (left as an exercise for the reader :).

Bug In Mathematica 10.2 and Earlier

In Mathematica version 10.2, a bug in the Dataset type system will prevent the exhibited expressions from working properly. To dodge the bug, we must use the usual work-around when faced with a type-error in Dataset: extract the data from the Dataset, transform it, and then stuff it back into a new Dataset:

plots// Normal // Query[
  GroupBy[{#color&, #suit&, #elf& -> (#plot&)}] /*
    KeySortBy[<|"Red"->1,"Black"->2|>] /* Dataset
, KeySort /* KeyMap[Pane[#, 50]&] /* Dataset
, KeySort
, First
]
$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you! I learned a lot from studying your code. Also, I updated my post to include an idea for how to deal with the repeated column headers (it gets only halfway there, though). $\endgroup$ – kjo May 15 '16 at 11:58
  • $\begingroup$ BTW, your code is very clear, a rarity in the Mathematica world (ironically enough, given WRI's titanic efforts to support the "literate programming" ideal). In particular, your idea of beginning lines with the separator works really well here. $\endgroup$ – kjo May 15 '16 at 12:01

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.