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Let m=[1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]; be a set and let s=[ 2,4,5,6,8,9]; be a subset of m. How do list all missing numbers in s from m.

For example, the missing numbers in s from 1-->10 are 1,3,7,10. So, how can list them?

Thanks.

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closed as off-topic by Jason B., RunnyKine, user9660, LLlAMnYP, Yves Klett Mar 17 '16 at 12:34

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question arises due to a simple mistake such as a trivial syntax error, incorrect capitalization, spelling mistake, or other typographical error and is unlikely to help any future visitors, or else it is easily found in the documentation." – Jason B., RunnyKine, Community, LLlAMnYP, Yves Klett
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    $\begingroup$ You want Complement $\endgroup$ – Quantum_Oli Mar 17 '16 at 10:44
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    $\begingroup$ I felt like a downvote at first, but Complement doesn't seem to come up quickly when searching the documentation with keywords from the OP. Still, the documentation deserves a more thoughtful read, Complement is quite a trivial function that comes up early on, learning the language. $\endgroup$ – LLlAMnYP Mar 17 '16 at 11:35
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First of all, have a look at,

Lists

Constructing Lists

List Manipulation

How to | Use Brackets and Braces Correctly

The Four Kinds of Bracketing in the Wolfram Language

and

Complement

Find which elements in the first list are not in any of the subsequent lists

m = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10}

s = {2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9}

Complement[m, s]
{*
{1, 3, 7, 10}
*}
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