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When I first learned about Mathematica online, I was very excited about it. However, it is not a free service, but a subscription similar to normal mathematica. Moreover, everything I look up about MO is like announcements of its existence and similar, blog style stuff, but where the hell is it? How do I (as a mathematica subscriber) access it? And especially, can I make programs in it that the public can view without a subscription?

As a MWE, let's just go with this. How can I make the following visualization appear at a webpage for which I can simply share the URL and a public user can see it and manipulate the slider?

Manipulate[Plot[Sin[x (1 + a x)], {x, 0, 6}], {a, 0, 2}]
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  • $\begingroup$ wolfram.com/cdf-player might be what you seek. $\endgroup$ – barrycarter Feb 12 '16 at 18:43
  • $\begingroup$ That is pretty similar to my goal, yes. However, the solution is not what I desire, because it requires a user to install something just to view it. In fact, I can't even test this out at the moment without administrator privileges on my work pc. I'm hoping there's a better solution available, but it's looking like Wolfram wants to protect itself to the point of limitation. $\endgroup$ – Steve Feb 12 '16 at 19:02
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    $\begingroup$ I don't think Wolfram offers a tool that converts "Manipulate" to HTML5, Javascript, or anything like that. It would be interesting and theoretically possible to create one. $\endgroup$ – barrycarter Feb 12 '16 at 19:03
  • $\begingroup$ youtube.com/watch?v=EjCWdsrVcBM at 35 minutes into the video Wolfram demonstrates a cloud object $\endgroup$ – Conor Cosnett Feb 12 '16 at 19:40
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CloudDeploy[Manipulate[Plot[Sin[x (1 + a x)], {x, 0, 6}], {a, 0, 2}],Permissions -> "Public"]

Here is what I found in the documentation: Best of luck:

http://wolfram.com/xid/05fd5yprh6-xcjygt

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ You must add the option Permissions -> "Public" if you want that anybody can use it. But it will spend "Cloudcredits", I think $\endgroup$ – andre314 Feb 12 '16 at 19:53
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    $\begingroup$ This asks me to sign in with my Wolfram ID and password. I guess "public" would need to have a Wolfram ID to access this manipulate object? $\endgroup$ – dearN Feb 13 '16 at 2:26
  • $\begingroup$ @drN No, normally, "Public" can access the manipulate object without Wolfram ID, without registration, even without free registration. For the user, there is absolutly nothing to do. Though the one who create the object must be registred and have some CloudCredits available. Some CloudCredit are offered by Wolfram (Personnaly, I have obtained freely 6250 CloudCredit without cost, and I think I will have 1000 CloudCredits/Month automaticcaly, freely) $\endgroup$ – andre314 Feb 13 '16 at 11:51
  • $\begingroup$ How can I check if I currently have CloudCredits or if I am on a Mathematica subscription that comes with an automatic CloudCredit income rate? $\endgroup$ – Steve Feb 15 '16 at 17:02

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