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Is there any in-built function or a recommended package that enables one to find, say, 10 Parameters, which are used as boundary conditions in NDSolve, that minimize $\chi^2$?

parameters={a,b,c,d,e,f,g,h,...};
NDsolve[ 
{...,
y1[10^10]=a,
y2[10^10]=b,
y3[10^10]=c,
y4[10^10]=d,
y5[10^10]=e,
y5[10^10]=f
}
,{y1[u],y2[u],y3[u],y4[u],y5[u],y6[u]},
{u,1,10^15}];

m[1]=g*y1[10^2];
m[2]=g*y2[10^2];
m[3]=h*y3[10^2];
...

Mexp = {171.7, 6.19*10^-1, 1.27*10^-3, 2.89, 5.5*10^-2, 2.9*10^-3, 
   1.74624, 1.0272*10^-1, 4.8657*10^-4};
Merrors = {0.05*Mexp[[1]], 0.05*Mexp[[2]], 0.05*Mexp[[3]], 
   0.05*Mexp[[4]], 0.05*Mexp[[5]], 0.05*Mexp[[6]], 0.05*Mexp[[7]], 
   0.05*Mexp[[8]], 0.05*Mexp[[9]]};

chisquare = Sum[((Mexp[[i]] - m[[i]])/Merrors[[i]])^2, {i, 9}];

Any ideas would be much appreciated!

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ParametricNDSolve will return a numerical ODE solution with any number of free parameters. This parametric solution can then be fed into NonLinearModelFit (or whatever home-brew chi-squared algorithm you want to cook up) to find the best-fit values for the parameters.

As an example, suppose we want have the ODE $y''(x) = - y(x)$, with initial conditions $y(0) = 0$ and $y'(0) = a$. We want to find the value of $a$ for which the solution best fits the points $(1,1)$, $(2, 1.5)$, and $(3, 0)$. This is accomplished by the following code:

data = {{1, 1}, {2, 1.5}, {3, 0}};
soln = ParametricNDSolve[{y''[x] == -y[x], y[0] == 0, y'[0] == a}, y, {x, 0, 5}, {a}];
model[a_, x_] := (y /. soln)[a][x]
fit = NonlinearModelFit[data, model[a, x], {a}, x]

(* FittedModel[InterpolatingFunction[Domain: {{0.,5.}} Output: scalar][x]] *)

Show[Plot[fit[x], {x, 0, 5}], ListPlot[data]]

enter image description here

Of course, in this case, we know what the solutions will be ($y(x) = a \sin x$), and they end up yielding a linear model in $a$; so you could probably simplify the code or use different algorithms for this "toy case". But these nice features will not be the case for a general ODE, and so I wrote up this more general method.

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