2 replaced http://mathematica.stackexchange.com/ with https://mathematica.stackexchange.com/
source | link

Just as a complementary and extended comment and as was recently observed in a related postpost, you get exactly the same problem if, not surprisingly, you use geometric transformation functions instead:

Given the initial object to transform:

circles = {Circle[{0, 0}, 1], Circle[{0, 0.5}, 0.5]};

the OP transformation:

t1 = Rotate[Scale[circles, 12], -45 Degree, {0, 0}];

is equivalent to:

t2 = GeometricTransformation[circles, 
   ScalingTransform[{12, 12}].RotationTransform[-45 Degree, {0, 0}]];

and you can check they exactly superimpose:

GraphicsGrid@Partition[Table[Graphics[{t1,t2},
    PlotRange -> {{-a, a}, {-a, a}}, ImageSize -> 100], {a, 11, 20}], 5]

enter image description here

You can also observe this strange behaviour just by manually resizing the graphic:

Graphics[t2] (* or Graphics[t1] *) 

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

Just as a complementary and extended comment and as was recently observed in a related post, you get exactly the same problem if, not surprisingly, you use geometric transformation functions instead:

Given the initial object to transform:

circles = {Circle[{0, 0}, 1], Circle[{0, 0.5}, 0.5]};

the OP transformation:

t1 = Rotate[Scale[circles, 12], -45 Degree, {0, 0}];

is equivalent to:

t2 = GeometricTransformation[circles, 
   ScalingTransform[{12, 12}].RotationTransform[-45 Degree, {0, 0}]];

and you can check they exactly superimpose:

GraphicsGrid@Partition[Table[Graphics[{t1,t2},
    PlotRange -> {{-a, a}, {-a, a}}, ImageSize -> 100], {a, 11, 20}], 5]

enter image description here

You can also observe this strange behaviour just by manually resizing the graphic:

Graphics[t2] (* or Graphics[t1] *) 

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

Just as a complementary and extended comment and as was recently observed in a related post, you get exactly the same problem if, not surprisingly, you use geometric transformation functions instead:

Given the initial object to transform:

circles = {Circle[{0, 0}, 1], Circle[{0, 0.5}, 0.5]};

the OP transformation:

t1 = Rotate[Scale[circles, 12], -45 Degree, {0, 0}];

is equivalent to:

t2 = GeometricTransformation[circles, 
   ScalingTransform[{12, 12}].RotationTransform[-45 Degree, {0, 0}]];

and you can check they exactly superimpose:

GraphicsGrid@Partition[Table[Graphics[{t1,t2},
    PlotRange -> {{-a, a}, {-a, a}}, ImageSize -> 100], {a, 11, 20}], 5]

enter image description here

You can also observe this strange behaviour just by manually resizing the graphic:

Graphics[t2] (* or Graphics[t1] *) 

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

1
source | link

Just as a complementary and extended comment and as was recently observed in a related post, you get exactly the same problem if, not surprisingly, you use geometric transformation functions instead:

Given the initial object to transform:

circles = {Circle[{0, 0}, 1], Circle[{0, 0.5}, 0.5]};

the OP transformation:

t1 = Rotate[Scale[circles, 12], -45 Degree, {0, 0}];

is equivalent to:

t2 = GeometricTransformation[circles, 
   ScalingTransform[{12, 12}].RotationTransform[-45 Degree, {0, 0}]];

and you can check they exactly superimpose:

GraphicsGrid@Partition[Table[Graphics[{t1,t2},
    PlotRange -> {{-a, a}, {-a, a}}, ImageSize -> 100], {a, 11, 20}], 5]

enter image description here

You can also observe this strange behaviour just by manually resizing the graphic:

Graphics[t2] (* or Graphics[t1] *) 

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here