2 replaced http://stackoverflow.com/ with https://stackoverflow.com/
source | link

As an alternative to DumpSave, what I've done in the past was to Compress the relevant results and store them within the same notebook. You can optionally set things up so that your data/results would self-uncompress themselves upon being called the first time. For one example of such use, see this answerthis answer.

In any case, the advantage of this approach is that everything is stored within your notebook, so you don't have dependencies on external files (actually, one of the reasons I needed this set-up was to be able to communicate my results to my collaborators, and make sure that all they have to do is to run the code in the notebook. This worked quite well).

As an alternative to DumpSave, what I've done in the past was to Compress the relevant results and store them within the same notebook. You can optionally set things up so that your data/results would self-uncompress themselves upon being called the first time. For one example of such use, see this answer.

In any case, the advantage of this approach is that everything is stored within your notebook, so you don't have dependencies on external files (actually, one of the reasons I needed this set-up was to be able to communicate my results to my collaborators, and make sure that all they have to do is to run the code in the notebook. This worked quite well).

As an alternative to DumpSave, what I've done in the past was to Compress the relevant results and store them within the same notebook. You can optionally set things up so that your data/results would self-uncompress themselves upon being called the first time. For one example of such use, see this answer.

In any case, the advantage of this approach is that everything is stored within your notebook, so you don't have dependencies on external files (actually, one of the reasons I needed this set-up was to be able to communicate my results to my collaborators, and make sure that all they have to do is to run the code in the notebook. This worked quite well).

1
source | link

As an alternative to DumpSave, what I've done in the past was to Compress the relevant results and store them within the same notebook. You can optionally set things up so that your data/results would self-uncompress themselves upon being called the first time. For one example of such use, see this answer.

In any case, the advantage of this approach is that everything is stored within your notebook, so you don't have dependencies on external files (actually, one of the reasons I needed this set-up was to be able to communicate my results to my collaborators, and make sure that all they have to do is to run the code in the notebook. This worked quite well).