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Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript

What you see after pressing Ctrl + Shift + E in this case is Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript code. You can find some information about it in MathGroups archives:

Mathematica abbreviated PostScript

This is the PostScript that is understood by the notebook front end and is generated by the Mathematica kernel when it is asked to display a graphic. It contains a lot of abbreivated PostScript operators to reduce the size of the PostScript string stored by the front end. In order for PostScript interpreters to understand Mathematica-generated PostScript, some translation must be done that adds all of the macro definitions. In the old days, this was done by the shell script psfix and the DOS program RASTERPS.EXE. Nowadays, both the front end and the kernel have ways of doing this directly.

In Mathematica versions prior to v.8 it was possible to generate Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript code by exporting to "APS" or "MPS" format, but starting from v.8 they are not recognized anymore by ExportString and DisplayString. DisplayString still converts Graphics to EPS although axes are lost in the rendered graphic:

CellPrint@
 Cell[GraphicsData["PostScript", 
   DisplayString[Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}]]]]

screenshot

The same is applicable to exporting to EPS:

CellPrint@
 Cell@GraphicsData["PostScript", 
   ExportString[Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}], "EPS"]]

One can try to fix this by converting axes to exact graphical primitives:

fix = First[ImportString[ExportString[#, "PDF"], "PDF"]] &;
CellPrint@
 Cell@GraphicsData["PostScript", 
   ExportString[fix@Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}], "EPS"]]

screenshot

But as one can see FrontEnd renders the EPS code incorrectly.

In Mathematica prior to v.6 it was also possible to convert any Cell to Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript by the FrontEnd menu entry Cell -> Convert To -> PostScript. Starting from v.6 it is still possible to do it programmatically:

Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}]
SelectionMove[EvaluationNotebook[], Previous, CellContents];
FrontEndExecute[
  FrontEndToken[EvaluationNotebook[], "SelectionConvert", 
   "PostScript"]];

screenshot

Fortunately, now everything is rendered nicely!

Metafile (under Windows) and PDF (under OS X)

Some other formats supported by GraphicsData are "MetaFile" (only under Windows) and "PDF" (only under OS X). You can convert any Graphics to one of these formats by selecting it and choosing the corresponding FrontEnd menu entry under Cell -> Convert To. The Metafile graphics produced is movable as PostScript. Note however that such graphics will be rendered only under OS which supports it.

Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript

What you see after pressing Ctrl + Shift + E in this case is Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript code. You can find some information about it in MathGroups archives:

Mathematica abbreviated PostScript

This is the PostScript that is understood by the notebook front end and is generated by the Mathematica kernel when it is asked to display a graphic. It contains a lot of abbreivated PostScript operators to reduce the size of the PostScript string stored by the front end. In order for PostScript interpreters to understand Mathematica-generated PostScript, some translation must be done that adds all of the macro definitions. In the old days, this was done by the shell script psfix and the DOS program RASTERPS.EXE. Nowadays, both the front end and the kernel have ways of doing this directly.

In Mathematica versions prior to v.8 it was possible to generate Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript code by exporting to "APS" or "MPS" format, but starting from v.8 they are not recognized anymore by ExportString and DisplayString. DisplayString still converts Graphics to EPS although axes are lost in the rendered graphic:

CellPrint@
 Cell[GraphicsData["PostScript", 
   DisplayString[Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}]]]]

screenshot

The same is applicable to exporting to EPS:

CellPrint@
 Cell@GraphicsData["PostScript", 
   ExportString[Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}], "EPS"]]

One can try to fix this by converting axes to exact graphical primitives:

fix = First[ImportString[ExportString[#, "PDF"], "PDF"]] &;
CellPrint@
 Cell@GraphicsData["PostScript", 
   ExportString[fix@Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}], "EPS"]]

screenshot

But as one can see FrontEnd renders the EPS code incorrectly.

In Mathematica prior to v.6 it was also possible to convert any Cell to Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript by the FrontEnd menu entry Cell -> Convert To -> PostScript. Starting from v.6 it is still possible to do it programmatically:

Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}]
SelectionMove[EvaluationNotebook[], Previous, CellContents];
FrontEndExecute[
  FrontEndToken[EvaluationNotebook[], "SelectionConvert", 
   "PostScript"]];

screenshot

Fortunately, now everything is rendered nicely!

Metafile (under Windows) and PDF (under OS X)

Some other formats supported by GraphicsData are "MetaFile" (only under Windows) and "PDF" (only under OS X). You can convert any Graphics to one of these formats by selecting it and choosing the corresponding FrontEnd menu entry under Cell -> Convert To. The Metafile graphics produced is movable as PostScript.

Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript

What you see after pressing Ctrl + Shift + E in this case is Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript code. You can find some information about it in MathGroups archives:

Mathematica abbreviated PostScript

This is the PostScript that is understood by the notebook front end and is generated by the Mathematica kernel when it is asked to display a graphic. It contains a lot of abbreivated PostScript operators to reduce the size of the PostScript string stored by the front end. In order for PostScript interpreters to understand Mathematica-generated PostScript, some translation must be done that adds all of the macro definitions. In the old days, this was done by the shell script psfix and the DOS program RASTERPS.EXE. Nowadays, both the front end and the kernel have ways of doing this directly.

In Mathematica versions prior to v.8 it was possible to generate Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript code by exporting to "APS" or "MPS" format, but starting from v.8 they are not recognized anymore by ExportString and DisplayString. DisplayString still converts Graphics to EPS although axes are lost in the rendered graphic:

CellPrint@
 Cell[GraphicsData["PostScript", 
   DisplayString[Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}]]]]

screenshot

The same is applicable to exporting to EPS:

CellPrint@
 Cell@GraphicsData["PostScript", 
   ExportString[Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}], "EPS"]]

One can try to fix this by converting axes to exact graphical primitives:

fix = First[ImportString[ExportString[#, "PDF"], "PDF"]] &;
CellPrint@
 Cell@GraphicsData["PostScript", 
   ExportString[fix@Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}], "EPS"]]

screenshot

But as one can see FrontEnd renders the EPS code incorrectly.

In Mathematica prior to v.6 it was also possible to convert any Cell to Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript by the FrontEnd menu entry Cell -> Convert To -> PostScript. Starting from v.6 it is still possible to do it programmatically:

Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}]
SelectionMove[EvaluationNotebook[], Previous, CellContents];
FrontEndExecute[
  FrontEndToken[EvaluationNotebook[], "SelectionConvert", 
   "PostScript"]];

screenshot

Fortunately, now everything is rendered nicely!

Metafile (under Windows) and PDF (under OS X)

Some other formats supported by GraphicsData are "MetaFile" (only under Windows) and "PDF" (only under OS X). You can convert any Graphics to one of these formats by selecting it and choosing the corresponding FrontEnd menu entry under Cell -> Convert To. The Metafile graphics produced is movable as PostScript. Note however that such graphics will be rendered only under OS which supports it.

10 deleted 4 characters in body
source | link

Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript

What you see after pressing Ctrl + Shift + E in this case is Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript code. You can find some information about it in MathGroups archives:

Mathematica abbreviated PostScript

This is the PostScript that is understood by the notebook front end and is generated by the Mathematica kernel when it is asked to display a graphic. It contains a lot of abbreivated PostScript operators to reduce the size of the PostScript string stored by the front end. In order for PostScript interpreters to understand Mathematica-generated PostScript, some translation must be done that adds all of the macro definitions. In the old days, this was done by the shell script psfix and the DOS program RASTERPS.EXE. Nowadays, both the front end and the kernel have ways of doing this directly.

In Mathematica versions prior to v.8 it was possible to generate Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript code by exporting to "APS" or "MPS" format, but starting from v.8 they are not recognized anymore by ExportString and DisplayString. DisplayString still converts Graphics to EPS although axes are lost in the rendered graphic:

CellPrint@
 Cell[GraphicsData["PostScript", 
   DisplayString[Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}]]]]

screenshot

The same is applicable to exporting to EPS:

CellPrint@
 Cell@GraphicsData["PostScript", 
   ExportString[Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}], "EPS"]]

One can try to fix this by converting axes to exact graphical primitives:

fix = First[ImportString[ExportString[#, "PDF"], "PDF"]] &;
CellPrint@
 Cell@GraphicsData["PostScript", 
   ExportString[fix@Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}], "EPS"]]

screenshot

But as one can see FrontEnd renders the EPS code erroneouslyincorrectly.

In Mathematica prior to v.6 it was also possible to convert any expressionCell to Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript by the FrontEnd menu entry Cell -> Convert To -> PostScript. Starting from v.6 it is still possible to do it programmatically:

Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}]
SelectionMove[EvaluationNotebook[], Previous, CellContents];
FrontEndExecute[
  FrontEndToken[EvaluationNotebook[], "SelectionConvert", 
   "PostScript"]];

screenshot

Fortunately, now everything is rendered nicely!

Metafile (under Windows) and PDF (under OS X)

Some other formats supported by GraphicsData are "MetaFile" (only under Windows) and "PDF" (only under OS X). You can convert any Graphics to one of these formats by selecting it and choosing the corresponding FrontEnd menu entry under Cell -> Convert toTo. The Metafile graphics produced is movable as PostScript.

Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript

What you see after pressing Ctrl + Shift + E in this case is Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript code. You can find some information about it in MathGroups archives:

Mathematica abbreviated PostScript

This is the PostScript that is understood by the notebook front end and is generated by the Mathematica kernel when it is asked to display a graphic. It contains a lot of abbreivated PostScript operators to reduce the size of the PostScript string stored by the front end. In order for PostScript interpreters to understand Mathematica-generated PostScript, some translation must be done that adds all of the macro definitions. In the old days, this was done by the shell script psfix and the DOS program RASTERPS.EXE. Nowadays, both the front end and the kernel have ways of doing this directly.

In Mathematica versions prior to v.8 it was possible to generate Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript code by exporting to "APS" or "MPS" format, but starting from v.8 they are not recognized anymore by ExportString and DisplayString. DisplayString still converts Graphics to EPS although axes are lost in the rendered graphic:

CellPrint@
 Cell[GraphicsData["PostScript", 
   DisplayString[Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}]]]]

screenshot

The same is applicable to exporting to EPS:

CellPrint@
 Cell@GraphicsData["PostScript", 
   ExportString[Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}], "EPS"]]

One can try to fix this by converting axes to exact graphical primitives:

fix = First[ImportString[ExportString[#, "PDF"], "PDF"]] &;
CellPrint@
 Cell@GraphicsData["PostScript", 
   ExportString[fix@Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}], "EPS"]]

screenshot

But as one can see FrontEnd renders the EPS code erroneously.

In Mathematica prior to v.6 it was also possible to convert any expression to Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript by the FrontEnd menu entry Cell -> Convert To -> PostScript. Starting from v.6 it is still possible to do it programmatically:

Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}]
SelectionMove[EvaluationNotebook[], Previous, CellContents];
FrontEndExecute[
  FrontEndToken[EvaluationNotebook[], "SelectionConvert", 
   "PostScript"]];

screenshot

Fortunately, now everything is rendered nicely!

Metafile (under Windows) and PDF (under OS X)

Some other formats supported by GraphicsData are "MetaFile" (only under Windows) and "PDF" (only under OS X). You can convert any Graphics to one of these formats by selecting it and choosing the corresponding FrontEnd menu entry under Cell -> Convert to. The Metafile graphics produced is movable as PostScript.

Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript

What you see after pressing Ctrl + Shift + E in this case is Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript code. You can find some information about it in MathGroups archives:

Mathematica abbreviated PostScript

This is the PostScript that is understood by the notebook front end and is generated by the Mathematica kernel when it is asked to display a graphic. It contains a lot of abbreivated PostScript operators to reduce the size of the PostScript string stored by the front end. In order for PostScript interpreters to understand Mathematica-generated PostScript, some translation must be done that adds all of the macro definitions. In the old days, this was done by the shell script psfix and the DOS program RASTERPS.EXE. Nowadays, both the front end and the kernel have ways of doing this directly.

In Mathematica versions prior to v.8 it was possible to generate Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript code by exporting to "APS" or "MPS" format, but starting from v.8 they are not recognized anymore by ExportString and DisplayString. DisplayString still converts Graphics to EPS although axes are lost in the rendered graphic:

CellPrint@
 Cell[GraphicsData["PostScript", 
   DisplayString[Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}]]]]

screenshot

The same is applicable to exporting to EPS:

CellPrint@
 Cell@GraphicsData["PostScript", 
   ExportString[Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}], "EPS"]]

One can try to fix this by converting axes to exact graphical primitives:

fix = First[ImportString[ExportString[#, "PDF"], "PDF"]] &;
CellPrint@
 Cell@GraphicsData["PostScript", 
   ExportString[fix@Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}], "EPS"]]

screenshot

But as one can see FrontEnd renders the EPS code incorrectly.

In Mathematica prior to v.6 it was also possible to convert any Cell to Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript by the FrontEnd menu entry Cell -> Convert To -> PostScript. Starting from v.6 it is still possible to do it programmatically:

Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}]
SelectionMove[EvaluationNotebook[], Previous, CellContents];
FrontEndExecute[
  FrontEndToken[EvaluationNotebook[], "SelectionConvert", 
   "PostScript"]];

screenshot

Fortunately, now everything is rendered nicely!

Metafile (under Windows) and PDF (under OS X)

Some other formats supported by GraphicsData are "MetaFile" (only under Windows) and "PDF" (only under OS X). You can convert any Graphics to one of these formats by selecting it and choosing the corresponding FrontEnd menu entry under Cell -> Convert To. The Metafile graphics produced is movable as PostScript.

9 added 392 characters in body
source | link

Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript

What you see after pressing Ctrl + Shift + E in this case is Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript code. You can find some information about it in MathGroups archives:

Mathematica abbreviated PostScript

This is the PostScript that is understood by the notebook front end and is generated by the Mathematica kernel when it is asked to display a graphic. It contains a lot of abbreivated PostScript operators to reduce the size of the PostScript string stored by the front end. In order for PostScript interpreters to understand Mathematica-generated PostScript, some translation must be done that adds all of the macro definitions. In the old days, this was done by the shell script psfix and the DOS program RASTERPS.EXE. Nowadays, both the front end and the kernel have ways of doing this directly.

In Mathematica versions prior to v.8 it was possible to generate Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript code by exporting to "APS" or "MPS" format, but starting from v.8 they are not recognized anymore by ExportString and DisplayString. DisplayString still converts Graphics to EPS although axes are lost in the rendered graphic:

CellPrint@
 Cell[GraphicsData["PostScript", 
   DisplayString[Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}]]]]

screenshot

The same is applicable to exporting to EPS:

CellPrint@
 Cell@GraphicsData["PostScript", 
   ExportString[Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}], "EPS"]]

One can try to fix this by converting axes to exact graphical primitives:

fix = First[ImportString[ExportString[#, "PDF"], "PDF"]] &;
CellPrint@
 Cell@GraphicsData["PostScript", 
   ExportString[fix@Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}], "EPS"]]

screenshot

But as one can see FrontEnd renders the EPS code erroneously.

In Mathematica prior to v.6 it was also possible to convert any expression to Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript by the FrontEnd menu entry Cell -> Convert To -> PostScript. Starting from v.6 it is still possible to do it programmatically:

Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}]
SelectionMove[EvaluationNotebook[], Previous, CellContents];
FrontEndExecute[
  FrontEndToken[EvaluationNotebook[], "SelectionConvert", 
   "PostScript"]];

screenshot

Fortunately, now everything is rendered nicely!

Metafile (under Windows) and PDF (under OS X)

Some other formats supported by GraphicsData are "MetaFile" (only under Windows) and "PDF" (only under OS X). You can convert any Graphics to one of these formats by selecting it and choosing the corresponding FrontEnd menu entry under Cell -> Convert to. The Metafile graphics produced is movable as PostScript and usually is rendered much better.

Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript

What you see after pressing Ctrl + Shift + E in this case is Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript code. You can find some information about it in MathGroups archives:

Mathematica abbreviated PostScript

This is the PostScript that is understood by the notebook front end and is generated by the Mathematica kernel when it is asked to display a graphic. It contains a lot of abbreivated PostScript operators to reduce the size of the PostScript string stored by the front end. In order for PostScript interpreters to understand Mathematica-generated PostScript, some translation must be done that adds all of the macro definitions. In the old days, this was done by the shell script psfix and the DOS program RASTERPS.EXE. Nowadays, both the front end and the kernel have ways of doing this directly.

In Mathematica versions prior to v.8 it was possible to generate Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript code by exporting to "APS" or "MPS" format, but starting from v.8 they are not recognized anymore by ExportString and DisplayString. DisplayString still converts Graphics to EPS although axes are lost in the rendered graphic:

CellPrint@
 Cell[GraphicsData["PostScript", 
   DisplayString[Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}]]]]

screenshot

The same is applicable to exporting to EPS:

CellPrint@
 Cell@GraphicsData["PostScript", 
   ExportString[Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}], "EPS"]]

One can try to fix this by converting axes to exact graphical primitives:

fix = First[ImportString[ExportString[#, "PDF"], "PDF"]] &;
CellPrint@
 Cell@GraphicsData["PostScript", 
   ExportString[fix@Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}], "EPS"]]

screenshot

But as one can see FrontEnd renders the EPS code erroneously.

In Mathematica prior to v.6 it was also possible to convert any expression to Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript by the FrontEnd menu entry Cell -> Convert To -> PostScript.

Metafile (under Windows) and PDF (under OS X)

Some other formats supported by GraphicsData are "MetaFile" (only under Windows) and "PDF" (only under OS X). You can convert any Graphics to one of these formats by selecting it and choosing the corresponding FrontEnd menu entry under Cell -> Convert to. The Metafile graphics produced is movable as PostScript and usually is rendered much better.

Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript

What you see after pressing Ctrl + Shift + E in this case is Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript code. You can find some information about it in MathGroups archives:

Mathematica abbreviated PostScript

This is the PostScript that is understood by the notebook front end and is generated by the Mathematica kernel when it is asked to display a graphic. It contains a lot of abbreivated PostScript operators to reduce the size of the PostScript string stored by the front end. In order for PostScript interpreters to understand Mathematica-generated PostScript, some translation must be done that adds all of the macro definitions. In the old days, this was done by the shell script psfix and the DOS program RASTERPS.EXE. Nowadays, both the front end and the kernel have ways of doing this directly.

In Mathematica versions prior to v.8 it was possible to generate Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript code by exporting to "APS" or "MPS" format, but starting from v.8 they are not recognized anymore by ExportString and DisplayString. DisplayString still converts Graphics to EPS although axes are lost in the rendered graphic:

CellPrint@
 Cell[GraphicsData["PostScript", 
   DisplayString[Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}]]]]

screenshot

The same is applicable to exporting to EPS:

CellPrint@
 Cell@GraphicsData["PostScript", 
   ExportString[Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}], "EPS"]]

One can try to fix this by converting axes to exact graphical primitives:

fix = First[ImportString[ExportString[#, "PDF"], "PDF"]] &;
CellPrint@
 Cell@GraphicsData["PostScript", 
   ExportString[fix@Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}], "EPS"]]

screenshot

But as one can see FrontEnd renders the EPS code erroneously.

In Mathematica prior to v.6 it was also possible to convert any expression to Mathematica's abbreviated PostScript by the FrontEnd menu entry Cell -> Convert To -> PostScript. Starting from v.6 it is still possible to do it programmatically:

Plot[Sin[x], {x, -Pi, Pi}]
SelectionMove[EvaluationNotebook[], Previous, CellContents];
FrontEndExecute[
  FrontEndToken[EvaluationNotebook[], "SelectionConvert", 
   "PostScript"]];

screenshot

Fortunately, now everything is rendered nicely!

Metafile (under Windows) and PDF (under OS X)

Some other formats supported by GraphicsData are "MetaFile" (only under Windows) and "PDF" (only under OS X). You can convert any Graphics to one of these formats by selecting it and choosing the corresponding FrontEnd menu entry under Cell -> Convert to. The Metafile graphics produced is movable as PostScript.

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