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For Mean you don't have to do any transformation to the input array

 data = {{1, 2, 3}, {4, 5, 6}, {7, 8, 9}};
 Mean[data]
 (* {4, 5, 6} *)

because (from docs Mean >> More Information)

enter image description here

that is, Mean "threads" over its input when it is fed an array.

In general, in addition to

func/@Transpose[data] 

(as in @m_goldberg's answer)

you can also use

MapThread[func, data]

or

func /@ Thread[data]

to get

{func[{1, 4, 7}], func[{2, 5, 8}], func[{3, 6, 9}]}

For Mean you don't have to do any transformation to the input array

 data = {{1, 2, 3}, {4, 5, 6}, {7, 8, 9}};
 Mean[data]
 (* {4, 5, 6} *)

because (from docs Mean >> More Information)

enter image description here

For Mean you don't have to do any transformation to the input array

 data = {{1, 2, 3}, {4, 5, 6}, {7, 8, 9}};
 Mean[data]
 (* {4, 5, 6} *)

because (from docs Mean >> More Information)

enter image description here

that is, Mean "threads" over its input when it is fed an array.

In general, in addition to

func/@Transpose[data] 

(as in @m_goldberg's answer)

you can also use

MapThread[func, data]

or

func /@ Thread[data]

to get

{func[{1, 4, 7}], func[{2, 5, 8}], func[{3, 6, 9}]}
1
source | link

For Mean you don't have to do any transformation to the input array

 data = {{1, 2, 3}, {4, 5, 6}, {7, 8, 9}};
 Mean[data]
 (* {4, 5, 6} *)

because (from docs Mean >> More Information)

enter image description here