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5h
answered Obtain constant from DSolve
1d
comment How to export images in EPS format that can be opened in CorelDraw
Thank you, you are right, it is my miswritings, in fact I do exactly this, without the option "EPS" though
1d
comment Displaying Greek letters with subscripts inside plot
As well as Szabolcs does I do not understand the question, but what I understand is that you (a) use the BoxLanguage incorrectly and (b) in the place where it is easier not to use it, but to make use of more simple tools. In particular, instead of {SubsuperscriptBox["\[Xi]", "in", ""] // DisplayForm you may type Esc+x+Esc then Ctrl+- and then in . You will get what you need, no difficulties. Or also PlotLabel->Style["y=7"] where y=Esc+x+Esc then Ctrl+- and then out You did not explain what is dpl, hence I cannot help more.
2d
comment steady state of coupled partial differential equations
Interesting, the PDE functionality has still no nonlinear solver, but you seem to solve it nevertheless. Is it the good old method of lines?
2d
awarded  Good Answer
Jun
28
comment How to export images in EPS format that can be opened in CorelDraw
@Nasser Unfortunateloy, I do not use Lunix
Jun
28
asked How to export images in EPS format that can be opened in CorelDraw
Jun
28
comment Does Mathematica have a built-in tool that allows one to operate on both sides of an equation?
@m_goldberg I agree, I also often use this trick. There are, however, two different situations: (1) when without transforming to the list the operation cannot be done, and (2) when one can do the same either with or without going to a list. The first case arises, if Mma might make an undesireble simplification of terms in the course of transformation. In such a case the list form prevents it.
Jun
28
comment Does Mathematica have a built-in tool that allows one to operate on both sides of an equation?
@kirma "Frankly, I would write eq2 = Map[Expand[Divide[#, 16]] &, eq1] in practice as eq2 = Expand[#/16] & /@ eq1" Do you see any difference?
Jun
28
comment Does Mathematica have a built-in tool that allows one to operate on both sides of an equation?
@kirma "Was there a specific (non-educational) point in writing Divide and Plus?" These are the full forms of the corresponding operations. Try a+b//FullForm to check it. They are nor worse that the traditional form, but as soon as one needs to make such a calculation as above they are handy.
Jun
28
comment Does Mathematica have a built-in tool that allows one to operate on both sides of an equation?
@vaxquis Well, that is up to you. After some (rather short) it will become obvious. I would like to point out that such step-by-step operating on expressions (and not oly equations) I use not for teaching purpose at all. Using these as well as others tricks (not shown in my answer) I make my calculations in theoretical physics. Very efficient too.
Jun
26
awarded  Mortarboard
Jun
26
awarded  Nice Answer
Jun
26
comment How to filter list of list of rules on certain condition?
Then you formulate incorrectly, since it is not what stays in your question.
Jun
26
answered Evaluating a Series expansion of PolyLog function
Jun
26
answered Does Mathematica have a built-in tool that allows one to operate on both sides of an equation?
Jun
26
comment Inverse Laplace computation Mathematica
You are almost there. InverseLaplaceTransform[F, s, t] // ToRadicals // Simplify does the job. The result is an analytical expression. It is, however, a very long one, so that I cannot imagine that one can ever use it.
Jun
25
answered Symbolic cut-off of high-order terms
Jun
25
answered How to filter list of list of rules on certain condition?
Jun
25
revised How to make program for phase portrait?
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