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1d
comment Reduced interpolation order
You could try fixing the errors in three of your $y$-coordinates. For example, I'm pretty sure 4316 should be 44.4316.
1d
comment How to count and mark all counted objects in this image
Yes, this definitely looks like the distance transform of a binary image. Why not provide the original binary image in the first place?
1d
comment How do I plot a line delineating a subset of values on a 3D surface plot?
I'm glad to hear it. You can accept the answer by clicking the checkbox to the left if you want to indicate that it solves your problem.
2d
answered How do I plot a line delineating a subset of values on a 3D surface plot?
2d
comment Building bounded polygon around heatmap (or points)
"Areas where the histogram is more than some threshold value" Have you considered ContourPlot or RegionPlot applied to a SmoothKernelDistribution? After all, a SmoothDensityHistogram is basically a DensityPlot of the SmoothKernelDistribution of the data.
Nov
25
comment How do I draw a pair of buttocks?
This is the first answer on this site that has literally made me go "what the f—" out loud. So congratulations for that.
Nov
25
comment How do I draw a pair of buttocks?
If only ExampleData[{"Geometry3D", "Beethoven"}] was a full-body model, a judicious use of PlotRange would do it.
Nov
24
comment Plotting phase portrait from NDSolve (i.e., must plot x'[x], where $x=x(t)$)
In that case, you should edit your question, because "I want to plot $θ(t)$ and $θ'(t)$, over the range, say, {t, 0, 100}" is precisely what ParametricPlot is for. ParametricPlot[{θ2[t], θ2'[t]} /. sol, {t, 0, 100}]: i.stack.imgur.com/MAgJO.png
Nov
24
comment Plotting phase portrait from NDSolve (i.e., must plot x'[x], where $x=x(t)$)
If you want to plot $\theta'$ vs. $\theta$ for a specific known solution, what you want is not StreamPlot, it's ParametricPlot.
Nov
23
answered Parametric contour plot?
Nov
23
answered List(Line)Plot with a big jump
Nov
22
comment List(Line)Plot with a big jump
Insert a Null (or anything that's not a real number) where you want a gap. ListLinePlot[{{0, 0}, {1, 0}, {2, 0}, Null, {3, 5}, {4, 6}, {5, 7}}]
Nov
22
comment Histogram bin includes numbers out of range
If you go to the documentation for Histogram and click "Details and Options", it describes the different ways that bin width specifications can be given. One of the possibilities is {xmin, xmax, dx}: "use bins of width dx from xmin to xmax". That should work for you.
Nov
22
answered Interpolating a polynomial for with first and second derivative of points
Nov
22
comment Interpolating a polynomial for with first and second derivative of points
Then InterpolatingPolynomial[{{r1, y1, yp1, ypp1}, {r2, y2, yp2, ypp2}}, r] will do it. It returns the polynomial of minimum degree that satisfies the conditions, and since you have six conditions, you will automatically get a fifth-order polynomial.
Nov
22
comment Interpolating a polynomial for with first and second derivative of points
You don't have $f(r_1)$ and $f(r_2)$, only its derivatives?
Nov
22
comment What extrapolation method does Interpolation use by default?
By the way, "With cubic spline interpolation, the second derivative at the end points is zero" is only true for what are known as "natural" cubic splines, which are not the only possible type of spline. In any case, Mathematica does not use spline interpolation by default, but even when you specify Method -> "Spline" it doesn't use natural splines.
Nov
21
comment How to make hollow octahedron 3-compound?
I was sure this was a duplicate of an older question, but it's actually not...
Nov
21
comment Implement a piecewise function elegantly and efficiently
I believe your function is also equivalent to Clip[0.5 x, {Max[xmin, x - m], Min[1, x + m]}].
Nov
21
comment Mystifying failure of NonlinearModelFit
Providing a ballpark initial guess works for me: NonlinearModelFit[ts, a Exp[b t], {a, {b, 1/800}}, t]. Doesn't work with Method -> "NMinimize" though, which ignores it.