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seen Jun 8 '13 at 22:35

Dec
5
comment Using an inequality to select elements from a list and then plotting the results
Okay, this is what I did: I took the absolute value of x to rid of the negative values. I tried doing LogLogPlot and I received an error. So this is what I did LogPlot[f[Abs[logr], t], {t, 0, Max[logr]}] Is this correct, or did I do this wrong?
Dec
5
comment Using an inequality to select elements from a list and then plotting the results
Oh, right. So let's say we remove those negative x values, then how would I continue from there?
Dec
5
comment Using an inequality to select elements from a list and then plotting the results
Andy or anyone, What if I wanted to take the log of the resulting values and plot it with the log of the x values? How would I do that? Thank you guys so much for helping me!
Dec
5
comment Using an inequality to select elements from a list and then plotting the results
OOH! That seems simple also! Now what if I wanted to take the log of the resulting values and plot it with the log of the x values? How would I do that?
Dec
5
comment Using an inequality to select elements from a list and then plotting the results
Thanks :) I got it!
Dec
5
comment Using an inequality to select elements from a list and then plotting the results
Ooh, my confusion lies in the := Mean[UnitStep[logr - x]] part. Could you explain what it is doing for me?
Dec
5
comment Using an inequality to select elements from a list and then plotting the results
Andy, I don't think this is what I'm trying to do, but I greatly appreciate you trying to help. What I wanted to do is find all values in logr that is greater than the first value in x (so I essentially count however many values are larger than x), and then divide by the length of logr (like a probability). And then repeat with the next value in x.
Dec
5
comment Using an inequality to select elements from a list and then plotting the results
Right. So let's say the max value was .05, then I want to find count all values in logr that are greater than .05, and then divide how ever many numbers I found that were greater than .05 by Length[logr]. But instead of using just the max value, I want to do it for all listed values in x.
Dec
5
comment Using an inequality to select elements from a list and then plotting the results
What I'm trying to do is find typical values of logr, which i denoted x. And then count which values of logr are greater than x. I didn't know how to find "typical values" so I tallied all of the rounded values and am going to use those.
Nov
8
comment Trying to plot this probability
Thank you guys for your help! I really appreciate it. Colin, I was also confused about how I was supposed to go about this. But all my professor said was to plot the given equation above and to play around with the alpha values.. I really appreciate everyone's help though!
Nov
8
comment Trying to plot this probability
I've been trying to use the StableDistribution function, and I don't entirely know what to put in for the other four variables.. That's all my research professor had told me.
Nov
8
comment Trying to plot this probability
This is all my research professor told me to do.. I'm a bit confused myself as to which to show. BUT I need log P(X >= x) on the y axis and alpha logx on the x axis.
Oct
20
comment How to make all values positive?
OH! Thank you so much!