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comment 4-digit number, where $d_{1000} \lt d_{100} \lt d_{10}\lt d_{1}$
This StackExchange site is specifically about a software system called Mathematica. One solution to this problem with it is With[{digits = Array[c, 4]}, FromDigits[digits] /. Solve[Flatten@{Less@@digits, 1 <= # <= 9 & /@ digits}, digits, Integers]].
2d
reviewed Approve Loading FeynCalc
Apr
24
awarded  Good Answer
Apr
24
comment How can I plot two concentric circles with a polygon inscribed in one and circumscribed about the other
@J.M. I guess I wanted to write the solution starting from CirclePoints, and it didn't turn out too awkward to do so. The first sentence in my answer expresses the Weltschmerz involved in expressing the solution only in this manner. :)
Apr
24
comment How can I plot two concentric circles with a polygon inscribed in one and circumscribed about the other
@J.M. It was a strange experiment of the "avoid explicit trigonometry" sorts. :)
Apr
24
comment Find the number of $n$ such that $n!$ is a sum of three squares
I wasn't aware of PowersRepresentations, good to know! (Assuming one actually finds other applications than snarky Mma.SE answers for it...)
Apr
24
revised How can I plot two concentric circles with a polygon inscribed in one and circumscribed about the other
deleted 12 characters in body
Apr
24
reviewed Leave Open Average function value over an Interval
Apr
24
reviewed Close What is the good source to study advanced custom coding in Mathematica
Apr
24
answered How can I plot two concentric circles with a polygon inscribed in one and circumscribed about the other
Apr
24
reviewed No Action Needed How can I plot two concentric circles with a polygon inscribed in one and circumscribed about the other
Apr
24
comment Find the number of $n$ such that $n!$ is a sum of three squares
Make your search space bounded: Solve[{n! == x^2 + y^2 + z^2, x <= y <= z, Sequence @@ (0 < # < 70 & /@ {x, y, z})}, {x, y, z, n}, Integers] (* {{x -> 1, y -> 1, z -> 2, n -> 3}, {x -> 2, y -> 2, z -> 4, n -> 4}, {x -> 2, y -> 4, z -> 10, n -> 5}, {x -> 4, y -> 20, z -> 68, n -> 7}, {x -> 8, y -> 16, z -> 20, n -> 6}, {x -> 12, y -> 36, z -> 60, n -> 7}, {x -> 20, y -> 44, z -> 52, n -> 7}} *) - this is not necessarily fast, but it works.
Apr
24
comment Writing a word with straight lines
@VividD Actually I haven't come up with anything specifically fancy myself, but reg can be substituted with any geometric region (although mesh region is probably required for performance). Tweaking of distribution of properties of candidate lines and adding an exponent to weight values are two additional variations which come to my mind...
Apr
23
comment Writing a word with straight lines
@MartinBüttner Yes... I think line-mesh intersection should really work even otherwise and one should be just be able to check out RegionMeasure after that, but it appears that's a bit optimistic. I didn't actually notice you mentioned this problem on your answer, but played with it on my own...
Apr
23
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
23
revised Writing a word with straight lines
deleted 5 characters in body
Apr
23
answered Writing a word with straight lines
Apr
19
comment DiscretizeRegion fails for a triangular region
Could you report this as a bug to Wolfram Research and add information on the case number they give to it?
Apr
19
revised DiscretizeRegion fails for a triangular region
edited tags
Apr
19
comment Is there research about the Mathematica programming paradigm?
@LeonidShifrin Multiple independent compilers (or interpreters, if the language is particularly dynamic) show even better rigour. For instance, Python technically has a language spec, but you can't really replicate the language by just reading and understanding it. PyPy authors had to basically reverse-engineer CPython functionality in order to provide an another indistinguishable enough implementation. They at least had the source code; in the case of WL, the source code is considered a trade secret...