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31m
comment how to read this result?
Root[a, b] is the value of the bth root of a function a. Since your function has undefined constants (r, t and w), numerical value can't be found right away for this polynomial. ... & form is a shorthand for Function (see the documentation!) and #1 is the first argument of a function. In this specific case, you can expand the matrix to somewhat more conventiona form by using // ToRadicals // FullSimplify on it.
Oct
17
comment What is special about 70.329862 and InputField and Number and Dynamic?
@RolfMertig No problem. :)
Oct
16
revised What is special about 70.329862 and InputField and Number and Dynamic?
added 160 characters in body
Oct
16
revised What is special about 70.329862 and InputField and Number and Dynamic?
added 160 characters in body
Oct
16
comment What is special about 70.329862 and InputField and Number and Dynamic?
@MichaelE2 I hope these answers complement each other. :)
Oct
16
revised What is special about 70.329862 and InputField and Number and Dynamic?
added 736 characters in body
Oct
16
revised What is special about 70.329862 and InputField and Number and Dynamic?
added 736 characters in body
Oct
16
answered What is special about 70.329862 and InputField and Number and Dynamic?
Oct
14
comment Crop VoronoiMesh by States Latitude and Longitude
Ignoring lack of contents of SP.kmz, a question popped in my mind: how to compute Voronoi diagrams on a geoid, or other non-Euclidean surfaces?
Oct
13
comment Finding the area bounded by a logspiral curve and two straight lines
You can construct a ParametricRegion of two parameters, one the angle B, and other a multiplier of r from 0 (which is (x2, y2) to 1, which is the spiral. The problem with this construction is that Mathematica is still unlikely to be able to compute analytic area for this region, although ParametricRegion allows it to be defined...
Oct
12
comment Why does taking advantage of Listable change the results of a numerical computation slightly?
By checking that all reals in your computations are arbitrary-precision numbers (which WorkingPrecision does in this case, and for explicit numbers backtick like 1.5`20), numerical computations are performed in arbitrary-precision arithmetic. This is a bit different from machine precision, which is directly based on hardwired implementation on the CPU. This is a slightly convoluted topic to understand correctly; I suggest looking at the documentation on (arbitrary) precision and questions on precision and arbitrary-precision.
Oct
12
comment Why does taking advantage of Listable change the results of a numerical computation slightly?
Without digging into details, this is almost certainly related to machine precision limitations, and rounding in machine precision. $MachinePrecision is about 16, which means rounding occurs at that resolution (in practice, 53 bits). You can work in higher precision by using WorkingPrecision option in RandomReal.
Oct
9
awarded  Yearling
Oct
7
revised Pattern matching - comparing two lists
added 188 characters in body
Oct
7
answered Pattern matching - comparing two lists
Oct
7
answered Why does RandomFunction return variable number of data points?
Oct
7
comment Why does RandomFunction return variable number of data points?
You get as many points as necessary to cover time values from 1 to 10. In the case of Poisson processes, number of events per unit of time varies.
Oct
7
comment Increase precision for a entire notebook
RootApproximant can be considered as an alternative to Rationalize, but unless it is really expected inputs to be either Rationals or Algebraics, these are a hacks. Arbitrary precision arithmetic correctly tracks precision of results on basis of precision of input (it typically reduces over computations), unlike computations with "precise" inputs.
Oct
5
comment How can I find the greatest of this expression?
@DumpsterDoofus If you absolutely want to use the region form, this works, for instance: {a, b} \[Element] ImplicitRegion[a >= 0 && b >= 0, {a, b}]. It doesn't make much sense in this case, though. You can use simple constraints for a and b as their use is defined on the documentation. See the form Maximize[{f, cons}, {x, y, ...}].
Oct
5
comment How can I find the greatest of this expression?
{a, b} is a two-dimensional variable, while Interval[{0, \[Infinity]}] is a one-dimensional region. Domains and regions behave differently in this regard.