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Jan
15
comment Superscript standalone text
For your specific example, you can simply use \[Degree]C
Jan
14
revised Plot Shown Differently in Mathematica 9 and 10.3
added 4 characters in body
Jan
14
revised What is the default ColorFunction for MatrixPlot?
edited tags
Jan
14
revised What is the default ColorFunction for MatrixPlot?
deleted 2 characters in body
Jan
14
comment Why does Outer sometimes return a packed array, and sometimes not?
Er… personally I think this question is a little scattered, maybe you can consider divide it into 2 or 3 questions?
Jan
14
revised What is the default ColorFunction for MatrixPlot?
added 906 characters in body
Jan
14
comment What is the default ColorFunction for MatrixPlot?
@JasonB Can this be related to the version? I'm in v9.0.1. What if you try pattern Blend[__] & instead?
Jan
14
comment What is the default ColorFunction for MatrixPlot?
@Sayakiss See my edit.
Jan
14
revised What is the default ColorFunction for MatrixPlot?
added 186 characters in body
Jan
14
answered What is the default ColorFunction for MatrixPlot?
Jan
14
comment Manipulating Some Lists in Compile
If I understand the pseudo code correctly, it's just creating t described above? Then how about func[z_, nei_] := Module[{t = ConstantArray[0, Length@Flatten@z]}, t[[Rest@nei]] = 1; Partition[t, Length@z]]; func[Z, Neighbors[[2]]]
Jan
14
answered How to compile effectively?
Jan
14
comment Manipulating Some Lists in Compile
If you insist on compiling the topple[r], at least provide the definition of r, emptl, degZ, ijTok, L, NeighNodeand tcount, without all these one can not tell how to compile the function.
Jan
14
comment Manipulating Some Lists in Compile
Well, to be honest, I think you're in the wrong way. Compile is the toy of experienced Mathematica user and one should gain a good enough understanding for "coding in Mathematica" before trying it. I think you'd better describe what you're trying to do in a more clear way so we can help figuring out if there's a better way to code.
Jan
14
comment Manipulating Some Lists in Compile
"return another list that created with t and Z", how is the "another list" created? I think you'd better describe your problem more clearly.
Jan
13
comment Get position from one list and choose element of another list in Compile
Actually if one insists on AppendTo then Map will fail, not sure about the exact reason though.
Jan
13
comment Get position from one list and choose element of another list in Compile
Then are you just looking for a compiled function or you want to insist on AppendTo, Map etc.? If the former, then how about f = Compile[{{l, _Integer, 1}}, Module[{list = {{1, 1, 1}, {2, 2, 2}, {3, 3, 3}}}, list[[l]]]]; t = f[{1, 2, 1}]?
Jan
13
comment Get position from one list and choose element of another list in Compile
You're practicing to use Compile? If not, why not simply use t = list[[l]] ?
Jan
11
comment Trouble with shooting method for a 4th-order differential equation
@W.Robin 1. FindRoots2D is essentially a function that uses points on the plot of equation as starting points to find the accurate roots of equation with FindRoot so it should be as effective as "FindRoot with a bunch of good starting points", if you still feel worried, just plug the roots back to the equation to check if they're correct . 2. Check this post. BTW, you may also give a try to other answers under the FindAllCrossings2D question.
Jan
11
comment Trouble with shooting method for a 4th-order differential equation
@W.Robin The first pile of warning isn't a problem, it's because FindRoots2D (You've chosen this one, right?) uses Compile to speed up while our B.C.s aren't compilable, and FindRoot (on which the FindRoots2D is built) has failed at some bad start point, anyway this doesn't influence the result. The second pile is just from a simple mistake. You need Show to combine 2 graphics: Show[ContourPlot[ Evaluate[{bc1[a, b] == 0, bc2[a, b] == 0}], {a, 0.4, 0.8}, {b, -0.05, 0.25}], Graphics[{PointSize@Medium, Blue, Point /@ roots}]]