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Jan
6
comment Real Numbers in the Wolfram Language
@OleksandrR I would certainly welcome your contribution to the discussion base on your points in chat. I realize that this discussion will not lead Wolfram to change or add functions, but I find it enlightening nonetheless.
Jan
6
comment Real Numbers in the Wolfram Language
Michael E2, Unfortunately I have not been able to log in to the chat room. I even tried changing my password, to no avail.
Jan
6
comment How would I use sliders to manipulate the slope and intercept of a plane in a graphics 3d box while the cdf was running
You might start by drawing a single plane with Plot3D. From there you can identify, in your function, the parameters that you would like to vary. Each can then be associated with a slider.
Jan
6
comment Real Numbers in the Wolfram Language
Michael E2, I'm intrigued to hear (but have no reason to doubt) that mathematicians have several ways of looking at such basic objects as integers. My admittedly limited understanding was that such foundational issues had been resolved and agreed upon once and for all.
Jan
5
comment Real Numbers in the Wolfram Language
Daniel, Nice point, which had not occurred to me. Some readers may need a fuller explanation of the distinction between RealQ and TrueQ[Element[x,Reals]]. Would you expand your comment and submit it as an answer?
Jan
5
comment Table and memory efficiency
Bracket missing in Table[Table[i*j,{i,1,10},{j,1,10}]
Jan
4
comment Real Numbers in the Wolfram Language
Nice! I interpret your "distinct systems" to refer to disjoint classes. No number can be both an Integer and a Real data type. This flatly contradicts the mathematician's view of number classes. BTW, I was unfamiliar with $Machine epsilon. It seems to be the smallest difference between two numbers. Reminds me of the following question I have posed to middle school students to provoke a discussion of continuity: "What's the smallest number that's greater than zero?" Lovely disagreements ensue. Apparently, computers can answer that question but mathematicians cannot.
Jan
4
revised Real Numbers in the Wolfram Language
added 466 characters in body
Jan
4
comment Real Numbers in the Wolfram Language
Mr.Wizard I often disregard chat links because the discussions often stray from the issue at hand. As I understand it, that's the very reason they were created: to move potentially distracting conversations to the sidelines. As for the question of answers in the form of comments, people sometimes leave code-less answers of substance among the comments in the belief that formal answers require at least some Mathematica code.
Jan
4
comment IntegerQ and Element Integers give different results in one case
It is unfortunate that data types do not always correspond to number classes even though they may share the same name. See chat.stackexchange.com/rooms/19708/… for a discussion about data types versus classes of numbers (Real numbers).
Jan
1
comment “Unflattening” a list
+1 This seems like a very straightforward approach that guarantees that the structure will be maintained.
Dec
28
revised How to Update 2D List based on a binary array
minor improvements
Dec
28
comment How to Update 2D List based on a binary array
+1 Very clever use of 1's and 0's.
Dec
28
revised How to Update 2D List based on a binary array
added 18 characters in body
Dec
28
answered How to Update 2D List based on a binary array
Dec
27
comment How well does my function fit data?
Antonio, Take a look at :reference.wolfram.com/language/tutorial/… and also reference.wolfram.com/language/ref/NonlinearModelFit.html "AdjustedRSquared" will tell you how much overlapping (shared or common variance) there is between your data and your model. It is a measure of goodness of fit. You can also obtain confidence intervals.
Dec
27
revised Plotting piecewise functions
deleted 37 characters in body
Dec
27
answered Plotting piecewise functions
Dec
27
comment How well does my function fit data?
Antonio, Modeling can tell us how closely the data fit the function, but it does not, and cannot, tell us "whether the function is correct or not". In that sense, models are approximations. Furthermore, there will inevitably be conditions under which the model "breaks down", i.e. ceases to provide a satisfactory description of at least some aspects of the phenomenon.
Dec
23
awarded  Nice Question