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seen Mar 12 '13 at 5:36

Mar
11
awarded  Popular Question
Mar
12
comment Interpolating a Bivariate Polynomial over a Finite Field
Thanks. The NullSpace is just what I need.
Mar
12
revised Interpolating a Bivariate Polynomial over a Finite Field
added 773 characters in body
Mar
12
comment Interpolating a Bivariate Polynomial over a Finite Field
@Daniel, the x_i's are the elements of F, while the y_'s are the components of the received string, which may differ from the sent string due to errors incurred during transmission. The task is to find strings from RS(k,q) which agree with (y_1,...,y_n) in at least t components, with the hope that one of such strings will be the original string.
Mar
12
comment Interpolating a Bivariate Polynomial over a Finite Field
For my purpose, I am interested on the case where F=GF(p), p prime. I'm sure Mathematica can handle extensions of GF(p), but for now I would just like to implement the algorithm.
Mar
11
revised Interpolating a Bivariate Polynomial over a Finite Field
added 184 characters in body
Mar
11
revised Interpolating a Bivariate Polynomial over a Finite Field
added 1253 characters in body
Mar
10
revised Interpolating a Bivariate Polynomial over a Finite Field
added 197 characters in body
Mar
10
awarded  Informed
Mar
10
asked Interpolating a Bivariate Polynomial over a Finite Field
Jul
8
comment Creating custom functions with multiple arguments
This is exactly the structure of the code that I was looking for.
Jul
8
accepted Creating custom functions with multiple arguments
Jul
7
awarded  Student
Jul
7
awarded  Scholar
Jul
7
comment Creating custom functions with multiple arguments
Sorry for posting an incomplete code (the one I posted was even less than half the code I wrote). I never thought you would actually dissect the code I posted, since all I really needed is a way of creating a function with multiple statements. As a beginner in Mathematica with background in C, my tendency is to use LOOPs and IFs and I'm surprised there are actually shorter (and I believe) quicker alternatives.
Jul
7
comment Creating custom functions with multiple arguments
In R, the body of a is placed inside curly braces. The last value inside the braces is what the function returns when it is evaluated. For example, xyz<-function(m,n){x=set containing n elements; y=set containing m elements;z=cross product of x and y;z}. In mathematica the body of a function is not enclosed in {} and it returns the value after the = sign. (Or am I missing a key mathematica feature?)
Jul
7
comment Creating custom functions with multiple arguments
Hope this clarifies things up. I want to write a program (this might be the appropriate word for it), which is like a function in the sense that it takes arguments and returns an output. The program performs tasks (computations, assigning variables, etc) and I would like to find a way of writing such a program, and by running the program by simply typing the name and the arguments. The usual method of defining a function f[x_]:= doesnt seem to work for my purpose.
Jul
7
awarded  Editor
Jul
7
comment Creating custom functions with multiple arguments
Multiple statements, exactly.
Jul
7
revised Creating custom functions with multiple arguments
added 741 characters in body