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I'm a retired mathematics professor who's used numerous programming languages over the years, including FORTRAN, Pascal, and APL. My current programming interests are Mathematica and J (the jsoftware.com free product), both of which I've used in teaching.


Dec
17
comment Incorporating the minimum and maximum of the function in a Dynamic plot
Don't know whether this helps (or you already realize it): the second argument to DynamicModule could be a compound expression with components separated by semicolons. So you could end the compound expression with your Column expression and begin it with as many expressions as you need to find the min and max.
Dec
12
asked EquationTrekker PropertyValue errors
Dec
12
comment Mathematica 10 cannot solve definite integral
Seems to be OK in 10.0.2.
Dec
7
comment Get inverse of a matrix step-by-step
But LinearSolve doesn't show the process step-by-step, as the original question specified.
Dec
7
comment Evaluating the real part of an expression
To directly answer the question as asked: Mathematica has no way of knowing that you intend the symbolic entities $\chi$, $\omega$, and $\tau$ to be real; without further information, such entities might be complex.
Dec
7
comment Get inverse of a matrix step-by-step
I don't think that's the sort of "step-by-step" method the original question had in mind.
Dec
7
comment Get inverse of a matrix step-by-step
For any but the smallest order matrices, using the cofactor method is a computationally inefficient way to find matrix inverses.
Dec
7
comment Get inverse of a matrix step-by-step
I forgot to mention another auxiliary function to define on the way to constructing a program to find matrix inverses: one that adjoins to a given (square) matrix an identity matrix of the same shape. Moreover, you can make the process even fancier - and more realistic - by using scaled partial pivoting.
Dec
6
comment Get inverse of a matrix step-by-step
As @Michael E2 suggests, it's a very good exercise for Mathematica novices to write little functions that implement the 3 elementary row operations: scaling a matrix row, adding one matrix row to another, and interchanging two matrix rows. Then write a longer function that calls those functions in order to reduce a matrix to a reduced row echelon form. If the entries are going to be numeric, you'll want a function to round to 0 exactly entries that are sufficiently small. For more practical results, write and call a function that does partial pivoting.
Dec
6
awarded  Popular Question
Dec
3
comment How to control the length of vectors in VectorPlot
What about varying the first argument of VectorScale?
Dec
3
comment Organizing Wolfram language symbols with Entity
thanks for showing the code!
Dec
3
comment Repeating a Function
Try NestList.
Dec
3
comment Defining a function which displays odd numbers?
Is this a homework question? I ask because it's such a very basic task that any Mathematica novice ought to be able to do. What did you try?
Dec
2
comment Integrate with Subscript: does this crash your kernel too?
Without etAttributes[Subscript, HoldFirst], evaluating that Integrate expression under Mathematica 10.0.1 on my iMac almost immediate gives an answer, as a ConditionalExpression, involving HypergeometricU function under the condition that the real part of $z_i^2 > 0$. Why do you want to set the HoldFirst attribute for Subscript?
Dec
1
revised Is it possible to “pretty print” my input integral in Mathematica like Wolfram|Alpha does?
added 106 characters in body
Dec
1
comment Mathematica Numeric Output
But Cross is a built-in function for forming the cross-product of 3-dimensional vectors (and, more generally, in dimension n is the contraction of $n - 1$ vectors into the Levi-Civita tensor).
Dec
1
answered Is it possible to “pretty print” my input integral in Mathematica like Wolfram|Alpha does?
Nov
28
comment How do I create palette window with status area?
I don't see anything happening when I hover the mouse over the button; the :) icon is always there. (Mathematica 10.0.1, OS X.)
Nov
26
comment I need to move X to right side without solving or simplifying anything else
How can you "move x to the right side" without doing some kind of simplification? After all, you have a triply-nested expression involving x on the right.