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seen Jun 8 at 1:37

Astrophysics graduate student


Mar
16
awarded  Informed
Mar
10
revised Mathematica color schemes for the colorblind
changed "relief map" to "geographical map"
Mar
7
awarded  Yearling
Mar
6
revised Mathematica color schemes for the colorblind
Reordered a few things and added a TLDR summary at the beginning.
Mar
6
comment Mathematica color schemes for the colorblind
Some schemes are better or worse for the color deficient. As stated in my answer and the site I referenced, these blue/red schemes are better than rainbow schemes for the color deficient. I gave some examples that are consistent with the recommendation of that site, and I included information on how to look at other schemes for those who don't even know where to look.
Mar
6
answered Mathematica color schemes for the colorblind
Mar
5
comment Making Axes logarithmic in 3d plots
LevelScheme uses the same method that Martin Wijaya uses in his answer, but it adds features to make the plot look more professional. On page 4 of LevelScheme's CustomTickGuide.pdf, it states how to turn logarithmic plots into linear plots, which is how LevelScheme functions.
Sep
24
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
14
awarded  Nice Question
May
31
awarded  Teacher
May
30
accepted Speeding up random walk for many particles
May
30
answered How to create a list of pairs from 1d list(s)?
May
30
awarded  Nice Question
May
23
comment Speeding up random walk for many particles
I also notice a nice speed boost, but if I increase either numsteps or numparticles by a factor of 10, it seems to eat up all my memory (I have 4 GB, with at most 3 free) and hang indefinitely, requiring shutting down Mathematica. Any ways around this? I would like the flexibility to be able to go up to 100k steps, perhaps more, without reducing the number of particles. I should also note that I do not need high precision on the particle positions. Does reducing the precision speed it up much?
May
15
comment How do I get Mathematica to recognize a C compiler on a 64-bit Windows machine?
This did it! Without uninstalling Windows SDK (again), I simply installed the .NET Framework 4 link, restarted my computer, and then now it works. CCompilers[] now gives {{"Name" -> "Visual Studio", "Compiler" -> CCompilerDriverVisualStudioCompiler`VisualStudioCompiler, "CompilerInstallation" -> "c:\\Program Files (x86)\\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0", "CompilerName" -> Automatic}}` Apparently, this link didn't install .Net Framework 4.
May
15
awarded  Scholar
May
15
accepted How do I get Mathematica to recognize a C compiler on a 64-bit Windows machine?
May
15
revised How do I get Mathematica to recognize a C compiler on a 64-bit Windows machine?
edited title
May
14
comment How do I get Mathematica to recognize a C compiler on a 64-bit Windows machine?
let us continue this discussion in chat
May
14
comment How do I get Mathematica to recognize a C compiler on a 64-bit Windows machine?
No, and it's nowhere in all of Program Files. I'm curious why I need a file with "amd" in it, when I have an Intel processor.