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16

This was supposed to be a comment to Jason's answer, but it got a bit long. But wouldn't it be cool if you could just input a DNA sequence and have a plot? ... take that little snippet and paste it into the form on this site, then you can download a PDB file to import... By looking through the source of the make-na server form, I was able to figure out ...


27

The easiest way to do this is if you have a PDB file, then it's as easy as using Import. Here are a few examples from the RCSB's Protein Data Bank. To get the URLs, find a page for a given sequence or protein and right-click on the link next to "DOI:" and copy the link. Import[#, "PDB"] & /@ {"http://files.rcsb.org/download/5ET9.pdb", ...


3

You need the intersection between your surface and a plane defined by {0, -Sin[20 °], Cos[20 °], -2}.{x, y, z, 1} == 0 One way to get the intersection points is to use MeshFunctions to create a line and then use Cases to extract the line: eqn = {0, -Sin[20 °], Cos[20 °], -2}.{x, y, z, 1}; meshopts = {Mesh -> {{0}}, MeshFunctions -> ...


9

You can take Michael Trott's code and modify it a bit to easily plot these surfaces Import["http://www.mathematicaguidebooks.org/V6/downloads/\ RiemannSurfacePlot3D.m"] rsurf[func_] := Grid[{{RiemannSurfacePlot3D[w == func, Re[w], {z, w}, ImageSize -> 400, Coloring -> Hue[Rescale[ArcTan[1.4 Im[w]], {-Pi/2, Pi/2}]], PlotPoints ...



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