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2

There are likely many ways to go about this, but here is one which uses pattens and replacement rules: data = {{-0.6, 0.04, 22}, {0.1, 0.3, 1}, {0.4, 0.05,0.01}}; rule = {a_, b_, c_} /; Abs[a] > 0.5 && Abs[b] <= 0.05 :> {Item[Style[a, Red, Bold], Background -> LightBlue, FrameStyle -> Darker[Red, 0.25], Frame -> ...


1

You can do something like: TableForm[ Map[If[Abs[#[[1]]] > 0.5 && #[[2]] <= 0.05, {Item[#[[1]], Background -> LightBlue], Item[#[[2]], Background -> LightBlue], #[[3]]}, #] &, M], TableHeadings -> {{"x", "y", "z"}, {"correlation", "pValue", "tStatistic"}}] Grid has, as Kuba noted, a direct way of doing this, check ...


3

This is a job for Transpose. table = Take[Import["~/myfile.csv"]]; {x, y, z, time, bool} = Transpose[table]; (* do stuff *) output = Transpose[{x, y, z, time, bool}]; Export["newfile.csv", output, "CSV"]


3

What's wrong with nonPrimeSequence[x_] := NestWhileList[# + 1 &, x, Not[PrimeQ[# + 1]] &] nonPrimeSequence[24] (* {24, 25, 26, 27, 28} *) Well?


2

Here is another approach using only the functionality of TableForm itself: list = Range[4] & /@ Range[4]; title = "Bravo"; TableForm[{{list}}, TableHeadings -> {None, {title}}] This nests the list deep enough inside {{ }} so that the column labels provided by TableHeadings are applied only to a single column containing the actual table. The ...


4

Labeled[TableForm[list], title, Top]


3

There are many alternatives to If in Mathematica. One that you might use is rule replacement: Table[Mod[k, 2] /. {0 -> k, _ -> Sequence[]}, {k, 0, 10}] {0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10} Another is that you might write your own function that does exactly what you want, because Mathematica's Hold-related attributes allow you to write many control structures as ...


4

For variety's sake (and because I like Sow and Reap)... Reap[Do[If[Mod[k, 2] == 0, Sow[k]], {k, 0, 10}]][[2, 1]]


5

You can do this :- Table[If[Mod[k, 2] == 0, k, ## &[]], {k, 0, 10}] {0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10}


1

dr = {4, 7, 4, 8, 8, 5, 3, 4, 5, 4, 5, 5}; val = 4; Flatten@Position[Thread[Less[dr, val]], True] {7}


2

I think this does what you're trying to accomplish. Note, you're not using "pure functions" anywhere in your code, I just jiggered it to get what I think you're after, there are almost certainly cleaner ways to do what I think you're trying to do (like actually using pure functions, etc.) tempMakeTableAn[{analEqs_, concs_, initConcs_, rateConstants_, ...


2

You are seeing Module work exactly as it should, because it is designed to implement lexical scoping. Take it away, Wikipedia: In lexical scoping (or lexical scope; also called static scoping or static scope), if a variable name's scope is a certain function, then its scope is the program text of the function definition: within that text, the variable ...


3

Here's a way using ListConvolve and SparseArray's properties: list = {1, 2, 5, 2, 9}; SparseArray[UnitStep@ListConvolve[{-1, 1}, list]]["NonzeroPositions"] (* {{3}} *)


3

pckpstn = Pick[Range[Length[#] - 1], Negative@Differences@#] &; lst = {3, 1, 2, 5, 2, 1, 9, 1}; pckpstn@lst (* {1, 4, 5, 7} *)


5

Here's a way: lis = {1, 2, 5, 2, 9}; Flatten[Position[Greater @@@ Partition[lis, 2, 1], True]] (* {3} *) Here's an explanation: Partition will group the elements in twos Partition[lis, 2, 1] (* {{1, 2}, {2, 5}, {5, 2}, {2, 9}} *) Then we use @@@ to apply a Greater at level 1 Greater @@@ Partition[lis, 2, 1] (* {False, False, True, False} *) Since 5 ...


3

HanningFilter[signal_List] := With[{len = Length[signal]}, 2 signal Sin[Pi Range[len]/len]^2] Sin, Times,Power are Listable,that means Attributes /@ {Sin, Times, Power} Sin[{a, b}] {a, b}^2 {a, b} {c, d} (*{{Listable,NumericFunction,Protected},{Flat,Listable, NumericFunction,OneIdentity,Orderless,Protected}, {Listable, NumericFunction, ...



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