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39

You can create SlideShows using Mathematica and run it to demonstrate presentation. Main advantage of using such Slideshow over Powerpoint / PDF is that you can play dynamic content. This Link gives further details on how to create http://reference.wolfram.com/mathematica/howto/CreateASlideShow.html This screencast gives detailed steps on how to create ...


30

Prashant gave excellent references. Some additional tips I've found useful: You can turn off cell labels (the In[_] and Out[_] labels) from the option inspector by unchecking Cell Options->CellLabels->Show Cell Labels I've had to make PDF versions of the slides for various reasons. Mathematica does not do PDF page breaks very well, so instead of ...


25

AutoCollapse[] function Please try this code, based on Sasha's adaption of my own answer to this question. AutoCollapse[] := ( If[$FrontEnd =!= $Failed, SelectionMove[EvaluationNotebook[], All, GeneratedCell]; FrontEndTokenExecute["SelectionCloseUnselectedCells"]]) Then in a new cell: 2 + 2 AutoCollapse[] Always place AutoCollapse[] as the ...


17

Another method that I sometimes prefer is to use the presentation software of your choice (e.g. PowerPoint) and hyperlink the notebooks into that. For some things like showing lots of images (especially fullscreen) Mathematica is not very handy (yet). You can simplify the preparation for this by opening and evaluating all these notebooks up front. For some ...


17

I do this pretty regularly, and my strategy is to talk at the blackboard, show static slides, try to get the students talking/asking questions, and then finish things off with a Manipulate or two. One thing I have found particularly effective is to ask students to download a .cdf version and to use it as a springboard for a homework question. It's usually ...


16

You can install the LiveWeb plugin for PowerPoint which allows to embed a live webpage into a slide. Now you should prepare an HTML page with emdedded CDF object (here and here you can find old instructions how to do this, but probably there is easier way now) and embed it into a PowerPoint slide. People say that it works surprisingly well and you maintain ...


16

I've just completed the second run of a course I designed aimed at a roughly similar group of students. As background, my course, titled "Dynamics Systems Analysis & Modeling", is intended to be a bridge between calculus / very basic differential equations at the front end and control theory for engineers at the tail end. The goal of the course is to ...


14

You could alt-click an output bracket which will cause all output brackets to be selected and then ctrl-} to close all subgroups, which, in this case, will close all input brackets that had output. Alternatively, you could select all outputs in this way and check the menu item Cell>Grouping Close All Unselected


12

I find technology such as Mathematica lends itself nicely to alternative methods of instructional delivery such as Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning and the Flipped Classroom. I use both of these methods in entry-level and upper-level undergraduate classes with reasonable success. To that end, I would strongly suggest that you consider the role of ...


10

You can't. You can combine CDFs and content generated by other tools on web pages, though. From Frequently Asked Questions about the Computable Document Format (CDF) (Wolfram Research): Do CDFs plug in to Microsoft Office documents or PDFs? Currently, the CDF Player plugin only supports web browsers. We are exploring the same capabilities for a ...


10

I would do it entirely without ToString. The main tool in combining mixed type output in a given order is Row: Ns = 1; Table[Row[ { Ket[Row[{ Replace[ Quotient[i - 1, Ns], {0 -> "\[UpArrow] ", 1 -> "\[DownArrow] "}], Mod[i, Ns]}] ], Bra[Row[{Replace[ Quotient[j - 1, Ns], {0 -> "\[UpArrow] ", ...


10

I will tell you my personal thoughts. I don't like when my teacher uses a projector. He goes through slides, it's like you said, just fast. Two times per semester we have tutorials when he writes on the blackboard and it's far more interesting because he goes through every step and that's very important for me. When I exercise at home, I can recall every ...


8

CellPrint@ Cell[BoxData[ TagBox[GridBox[{{ToBoxes[Graphics[Circle[]]], Cell["Text", "SideCaption"]}}], "Grid"]], "SideCaptionArray"] SideCaption and SideCaptionArray are in the Default.nb style sheet if you want to change them.


8

data = Reverse@Table[{2^n, 1}, {n, 1, 6}]; Graph[Table[DirectedEdge[i, i + 1], {i, Length@data - 1}], VertexLabels -> "Name", VertexCoordinates -> ({#2 Cos[#1], #2 Sin[#1]} & @@@ data), Axes -> True, ImageSize -> 300]


7

When I execute this code at the beginning of a slideshow, the cells are presented one after the other and the slides change automatically. nb = EvaluationNotebook[]; n = 20; While[True, SelectionMove[nb, Before, Notebook]; Do[SelectionMove[nb, Next, Cell]; SelectionMove[nb, After, Cell]; Pause[1], {n}]] You might want to change n, and either hide ...


7

Here's a version which uses Inherited to pull the slide show's docked cell in. Unfortunately, there's a bug when Inherited references an empty value where it shows some needless whitespace. So this version uses Dynamic to detect the ScreenStyleEnvironment and switch its behavior accordingly. With[{mycell = Cell["Boo!", "DockedCell"]}, nb = NotebookCreate[...


6

I have learned a lot from Wolfram Training: Computable Document Format (CDF) Courses. And for a more advanced example from Wolfram Software Development Training Course: Developing Enterprise-Class Web Applications. For all these videos you can download the notebook to study the code.


6

You can use SystemOpen to open the link with system-wide standard browser/application: SystemOpen["https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yL_-1d9OSdk"] You can also use it to open files stored on the local hard drive using the default applications (i.e. the default movie player for movie files). E.g. in conjunction with Button: Button["Chicken", SystemOpen["...


5

It turns out that there are two ways to do this (building on the comments): -One is to print to file and use a pdf extension after setting the orientation to landscape at the relevant print options dialog. Normally, when exporting to pdf, mathematica chooses the best way to rasterize 3D graphics if you add an invisible polygon (triangle) as a texture ...


5

Short answer: don't lecture; have students work hands-on, initially from notebooks you prepare. Long answer: Over nearly twenty years I taught mathematics courses ranging from freshman calculus and sophomore linear algebra through sophomore-junior discrete structures to junior-senior complex analysis in which students had to learn Mathematica from scratch ...


5

You should be able to Shift+drag the corner handles of the orange frame to change the aspect ratio. (You may need to double click to get the thick gray editing frame first.) Note: if resizing individual elements Shift operates in reverse: holding it constrains the aspect ratio, while not holding it allows free resizing. You can resize the canvas using ...


5

Here is one programmatic way: the combinations will be Option (Alt) + up / down arrows. Here is the code: SetOptions[your-notebook, NotebookEventActions -> { "DownArrowKeyDown" :> If[MemberQ[CurrentValue["ModifierKeys"], "Option"], FrontEndExecute[ {FrontEndToken[EvaluationNotebook[], "ScrollPageNext"]} ]...


4

This might be a good time to use Dynamic objects that will update as required with controls, buttons, or UpdateInterval, leaving direct evaluation of cells for outside of class.


4

You can create the images with images = Image[ ListPlot[ pdata = Table[Sin[2 \[Pi] x/12.34], {x, #}] + RandomReal[.1, {#}]]] & /@ Table[i, {i, 100, 200, 10}]; and show them with Manipulate[images[[n]], {n, 1, Length[images], 1}] then you can export them with Export[NotebookDirectory[] <> "image" <> ToString[#] <> ".tif", ...


4

If you add Cell[StyleData[All, "SlideShow"], ShowPredictiveInterface->True, ShowCodeAssist->True] to your slideshow stylesheet then it will give you the predictive interface -- works for me using OS X 10.9.4 and Mma 9.0.1.


4

foo := Module[{r = Transpose@Through[{Cos, Sin}[2^Range[#]]], p}, p = Partition[r, 2, 1]; Graphics[{Opacity[.5], Red, Disk[#, .05] & /@ r, Opacity[1], Black, Text @@@ MapIndexed[{First@#2, #} &, r], Arrow[#, .05] & /@ p}, PlotRange -> {{-1.2, 1....


4

On a Mac you can go to the top menu Windows > ShowToolbar and add a toolbar to your notebook. This has a "back" button: Note that the toolbar goes away when the slideshow is in fullscreen mode.


4

After some frustrating hunting around, I think I found it. You have to enable this option in the option inspector (for the selected cells or the selected notebook): ShowGroupOpener WholeCellGroupOpener This will lead to the desired behaviour.


4

Here is an answer to this question derived from its comments. Currently there is no way to preserve the interactive capabilities of a 3D plot when using Export. If it is not possible to do the presentation with Mathematica itself, perhaps by using its slideshow capability, the next best recourse is to put the 3D plot in a CDF document and present it with ...


3

In this case memoization can be used. It can often be used for cases like this. pdata[n_, per_] := pdata[n, per] = Table[Sin[2 \[Pi] x/per], {x, n}] + RandomReal[.1, {n}]; Makes sure pdata never performs the same calculation twice. If we calculate all relevant values in advance, Do[pdata[n, 12.34], {n, 100, 200, 10}] They will already be stored when ...



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