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4

Note: shown below is an answer to the first version of the OP's question Here is a simple example using scoping constructs, namely Block in this case. The idea is that you can indicate symbols to make local to Block, which implements dynamic scoping: take a look at the "Background and Context" section of its docs for a more complete explanation. Symbols ...


4

As @MarcoB states, you should probably use scoping constructs... If you're opposed to that idea, you can set the Notebooks default context to be Unique to Each Cell Group. I wouldn't recommend that, but it works. You can set that under Evaluation > Notebook's Default Context > Unique to Each Cell Group: Note, to escape this, you need to specify ...


10

This is a documentation bug. Our source notebooks do contain documentation for experimental and future features, but they are supposed to be stripped in the process of being bundled with the product. In this case the bug is that the usage statement is marked as not to be included, but is still ending up in the built documentation. We apologize for the ...


2

You can insert your Manipulate[...] in a DynamicModule[{lower,upper},...]: DynamicModule[{lower, upper}, Manipulate[ Refresh[ lower = distPlotRange[distribution, -1, 4]; upper = distPlotRange[distribution, 1, 4]; fillRange = {Max[#[[1]]], Min[#[[2]]]} &[ Transpose[{fillRange, {lower, upper}}]];, TrackedSymbols :> {distribution} ...


2

One can localize the scope of variables to Manipulate by adding them as arguments to Manipulate with ControlType None. For your case Manipulate[Refresh[lower = distPlotRange[distribution, -1, 4]; upper = distPlotRange[distribution, 1, 4]; fillRange = {Max[#[[1]]], Min[#[[2]]]} &[ Transpose[{fillRange, {lower, upper}}]];, TrackedSymbols :> ...



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