Hot answers tagged

9

Fourth fork of the list of links. Manipulate/Dynamic Using Refresh[..] with TrackedSymbols Got Manipulate? (Seminar slides) Manipulate secrects revealed What is the equivalent of a prototypical Manipulate in lower level functions? Selective evaluation of blocks of code in a Manipulate Understanding CDF How to modularize custom controls for ...


9

Support for the mechanism that makes the CDF browser plugin possible is being phased out, and the CDF player already does not work on the newest versions of Google Chrome. In light of this there is no better time than now to start mixing the Wolfram Language with HTML and Javascript. The concerns of using Wolfram Language as a backend/server language is no ...


8

Here is a basic example of how Mathematica code would be deployed. Get["http://exampledata.wolfram.com/Collatz.m"]; ?? Collatz Collatz[5] {5, 16, 8, 4, 2, 1} You can look into APIFunction that you access directly if you want to build an interface with HTML/Javascript, or if you want a simple interface running on Wolfram's cloud you can use ...


8

Turning kjo's comment into an answer, the code is available from the publisher here.


5

To get a fixed step size with the BDF method you can lower the AccuracyGoal and PrecisionGoal to increase the adaptive step sizes and then use MaxStepSize to limit the step size to any value you want. Get an example stiff system from the documentation: Needs["DifferentialEquations`NDSolveProblems`"]; Needs["DifferentialEquations`NDSolveUtilities`"]; system ...


5

On the home page of the Documentation Center, in the lower left-hand corner, there is a label that says "Common How Tos", Do a mouse-over on it; it will turn red, showing that it is a link. Double-click on it and you will taken to a portal to many of the tutorials contained the documentation, including links to "Do Calculus" and "Work with Differential ...


4

You first need to familiarize yourself with the syntax and general structure of the Wolfram Language, which Mathematica uses. As a form of introduction you could look at a few Wolfram introductory screencasts, for instance: Hands-on Start to Mathematica Functional Programming: Quick Start Once you have done that, dive straight into the extensive ...


4

Wolfram Solutions: Bioinformatics Book: Illustrating Evolutionary Computation with Mathematica Docs: Life Sciences & Medicine: Data & Computation Wolfram Demonstrations: Biology Wolfram Demonstrations: Genetics Wolfram Books: Life Sciences Mathematica Journal: Biology Library: Bioinformatics Library: Biology


4

1) Simply amazing: http://intothecontinuum.tumblr.com/tagged/Mathematica 2) Jeff Bryant: http://members.wolfram.com/jeffb/visualization/3d.shtml 3) http://vqm.uni-graz.at/notebooks/index.html 4) http://www.vis.uni-stuttgart.de/~kraus/LiveGraphics3D/tutorial/tutorial.html#Basic%20Graphics 5) http://ieng9.ucsd.edu/~ma155f/Handouts/index.html 6) ...


4

Other related sources: 1) Overview of Basic Graphics Commands 2) Animating Mathematica graphics inside PDF using LATEX animate package 3) Graphics Programming 4) Various Functions of Mathematica about the knot theory 5) LATEX labels in Mathematica plots 6) Graphics Editing Outside of Mathematica 7) SciDraw 8) ...


3

Well, just to say it ... have a look at http://mathematica.stackexchange.com A great source anyway is the Wolfram Blog, but in particular I like The Ultimate Univariate Probability Distribution Explorer. You can find A plot gallery for Mathematica 9, if the author sees this he makes possibly an update to v10. The http://www.mathematica-journal.com/ is ...


3

Have you tried to extend the definition of NonCommutativeMultiply? Unprotect[NonCommutativeMultiply]; x_ ** 1 := x 1 ** x_ := x x_ ** Power[x_, -1] := 1 Power[x_, -1] ** x_ := 1 Protect[NonCommutativeMultiply]; After evaluating the above code y ** 1 y 1 ** y y y ** (1/y) 1 (1/y) ** y 1


2

Read some of the sections at http://reference.wolfram.com/language/tutorial/VirtualBookOverview.html Also, avoid functional programming until you are familiar with the basics.


2

Best Cheat Sheet so far... Pretty much the best Cheat Sheet I have come across so far, is the following one by Hugo Touchette, a theoretical Physicist teaching at the National Institute for Theoretical Physics, Stellenbosch, South Africa: Mathematica commands summary The sheet has been last updated in August 2014. There is btw also some useful $\LaTeX$ - ...


1

Stephen Wolfram: An Elementary introduction to Wolfram Language Also, this does not belong 100% here but it is an overshelming list of reference to be missed. A Bibliography of Publications about the Mathematica Symbolic Algebra Language



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