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10

RegionFunction is the option you are looking for. ContourPlot[ Evaluate[Sum[Sin[RandomReal[5, 2].{x, y}], {5}]], {x, -3, 3}, {y, -3, 3}, BoundaryStyle -> {Thick, Black}, RegionFunction -> Function[{x, y, z}, x^2 + y^2 < 9] ]


4

An alternative to RegionFunction is ConditionalExpression. Using @paw's cool example z = Sum[Sin[RandomReal[5, 2].{x, y}], {5}]; ContourPlot[Evaluate[ConditionalExpression[z,Norm[{x, y}, 2] < 3]], {x, -3, 3}, {y, -3, 3}, BoundaryStyle -> {Thick, Black}] ContourPlot[Evaluate[ConditionalExpression[z, z Norm[{x, y}] < 3]], {x, -3, ...


2

I have something like this in mind: I am posting this answer so that others can see what I have done. I have no intention of accepting this. Surely others will come up with better ideas. dat = {1, 4, 3, 7, 8, 9, 10}; labels = {"john", "mary", "rusty", "pi", "euler", "leonard", "rupert"}; ArrayPlot[{dat}, FrameTicks -> {{False, False}, ...


1

It is a curious thing, the default appears to do a linear interpolation ( ie. rendering more points than input ), yet specifying InterpolationOrder->1 dramatically increases the number of interpolation points: simple example: data = Table[ Sin[x] , {x, 0, 10}, {y, 0, 10}] // N; ListPlot3D[data] in = ListPlot[ data[[All, 1]] , PlotStyle -> ...



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