Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

When different plots use conflicting options, Show uses the first one listed. So, here it is using the PlotRange of the first graphics instance. Use Show[Table[ListPlot[{{i, i^2}}], {i, 1, 10}], PlotRange -> All] instead to see all the points. Further Explanation To see more clearly what is happening, consider the InputForm (as suggested by ...


7

This is the result of Plot Themes. This restores the old behavior: SetOptions[ParametricPlot3D, PlotTheme -> None]; More specifically the default Theme results in embedded Lighting values: Cases[ ParametricPlot3D[{f[t, z] Cos[t], f[t, z] Sin[t], -z}, {t, -Pi, Pi}, {z, 0.35 Pi, Pi}, Mesh -> None, PlotStyle -> Specularity[0], PlotTheme -> ...


5

There appears to be a bug in RandomPoint, as can be seen by plotting both region1 and region2, the latter defined by region2 = ImplicitRegion[6 <= x - y + 2*z <= 7, {{x, -5*Pi, 5*Pi}, {y, -5*Pi, 5*Pi}, {z, -10, 10}}]; Then pts2 = RandomPoint[region2, 10^4]; ListPointPlot3D[{pts2, pts1}, AxesLabel -> {"x", "y", "z"}, BoxRatios -> {1, 1, ...


4

The workaround is to put an \[InvisibleSpace] between the degree symbol and the C. Plot[x, {x, 0, 1}, FrameLabel -> {"x", "temperature / \[Degree]\[InvisibleSpace]C"}, Frame -> True] Note that the ImagePadding isn't very good in this case, but the C does indeed have the right baseline.


3

In the answer of Karsten 7. the BarLegend is shown as a Cell expression, and since I want to use the legend in an actual plot, it is not immediately useful. However, with the help of his/her answer, I managed to solve my problem. First I make the legend: barLegend = ToExpression[FrameBox@@MakeBoxes[ BarLegend[{"SunsetColors", {0, 1}}, LegendMarkerSize ...


2

I went back to the old legend functions that I used before BarLegend existed, and tried the following: First, copy the definitions of trimPoint, colorLegend, display and at by selecting the large code block in the section Color bar legend. Then do this: display[{ colorLegend[ ColorData["SunsetColors"], {-.5, .5}, LabelStyle -> ...


1

This is taking your first modification of the original code and just changing the way f is defined, then using that function inside the module. It seems to work fine for me. Clear[x, y, f]; x = 10;(*Global values have no effect on Module...*) y = 12;(*Global values have no effect on Module...*) f[x_, y_] := E^(-x^2 - y^2) + x y; Manipulate[ Module[ {x, ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible