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21

Chunks of weak compositions Here is slightly modified version of algorithm used in Combinatorica`NextComposition converted to a LibraryFunction. Needs["CCompilerDriver`"] " #include \"WolframLibrary.h\" DLLEXPORT mint WolframLibrary_getVersion() { return WolframLibraryVersion; } DLLEXPORT int WolframLibrary_initialize(WolframLibraryData libData) { ...


10

I'm posting a whole new answer because I don't want to inherit any of the votes I received for my previous wrong answer. In formulating my new answer, I was aiming for correctness, simplicity, and reasonable (but not stellar) performance. Simplicity was achieved by taking a recursive approach, the clarity of which gives me confidence in the correctness of ...


6

Just a way. Sorts first and removes identical elements, then elements that are strict subsets of other elements... fun[lst_] := Module[{sort = DeleteDuplicates[Sort[Sort /@ lst]], sa, w}, sa = SparseArray@ Outer[Boole[SubsetQ[#1 /. w -> List, #2 /. w -> List]] &, w @@@ sort, w @@@ sort]; ReplacePart[sort, Thread[(Last /@ ...


5

A function for data fully-sorted: myDelete[data_] := Block[{revdata = Reverse@data, manip}, manip[l_] /; Length@l == 1 := l; manip[l_] := Block[{rest = Rest@l, subsetq, firstelem = First@l}, subsetq = SubsetQ[firstelem, #] & /@ rest; {firstelem, Sequence @@ manip[Pick[rest, subsetq, False]]}]; Reverse@manip[revdata]]; ...


5

NSolve with adequate precision works well $Version (* "10.2.0 for Mac OS X x86 (64-bit) (July 7, 2015)" *) eqns = Sin[z + Sin[z + Sin[z]]] == Cos[z + Cos[z + Cos[z]]] && -3 < Re[z] < 3 && -3 < Im[z] < 3; roots = NSolve[eqns, z, WorkingPrecision -> 20]; And @@ (eqns /. roots) (* True *) Note that there are a large ...


4

At the end of this post you'll find the code for a small benchmark to compare LibraryLink with standard passing vs LibraryLink with MathLink based passing on two counts: function call overhead; use a function that does nothing, has no arguments, returns nothing (llNone and mlNone for LibraryLink and MathLink, respectively) passing real arrays; use a ...


3

You should use the SPICE toolkit (in C), which you can access from Mathematica with LibraryLink. The toolkit routines will handle all of the kernel access and coordinate transformations for you transparently and fast. In my opinion it would be both a waste of time and highly error prone to try to duplicate their functionality. Not to mention slower. The ...


3

Using: $posLenIdx = Association@MapIndexed[First@#2-> Length@#&, test]; $revItenIdx = Merge[Identity]@MapIndexed[Association@Thread[#-> First@#2]&, test]; and: testSet[set_List, {pos_}]:=Block[{biggerGroups, len = Length@set}, biggerGroups = Select[Tally@Flatten@Lookup[$revItenIdx, set, {}], ( #[[2(*qtd*)]] >= ...


3

I thought it interesting to ask where the roots determined by Bob Hanlon and Michael E2 lie in the complex plane. pts = Flatten[N[roots, 15] /. Rule[_, z_] -> ReIm[z], 1]; pts2 = Flatten[N[roots2, 15] /. Rule[_, z_] -> ReIm[z], 1]; As noted in their answers, the numbers of roots are 883 and 1251. One might suppose that the first list is a subset of ...


3

In V10, Solve works, too, and gives 1251 solutions. roots2 = Solve[eqns, z]; // AbsoluteTiming Length@roots2 Solve::incs: Warning: Solve was unable to prove that the solution set found is complete. >> (* {99.1951, Null} 1251 *) Maybe there are more, too. The timing is almost 6 times as long as BobHanlon's NSolve command on my computer. But ...


3

I'd like to expand on the answer given by @ChipHurst in the comments. My hope was that one of these approximate tests would be much faster than PrimeQ; however, that was not the case. Perhaps someone can code these methods more efficiently than shown here. Fermat's Little Theorem: Prime p and any b such that GCD[b,p]=1 implies b^(p-1)=1, mod p. Use a prime ...


2

Expanding @ciao's comment above: n = 3 10^6; n1 = 10000; v1 = Range[n]; o1 = Union@RandomInteger[{1, n}, n1]; o2 = Reverse[ o1/1000 // N]; (*Anything*) getV2[v1_, o1_, o2_] := Module[{f, v2}, v2 = 0 v1; v2[[o1]] = o1; (f[#1] = #2) & @@@ Transpose[{o1, o2}]; f[0] = o2[[1]]; v2 = f /@ FoldList[Max, v2] ] getV2[v1, o1, o2]; // Timing



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