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12

I had the same problem after switching to Mathematica 10. The issue here is the following: Export uses Rasterize to create the png image. The StyleEnvironement, which is used in Rasterized, cannot be specified as an option but is given by the $FrontEnd object (not by the EvaluatingNotebook[]!). You can change the StyleEnvironement by SetOptions[$FrontEnd, ...


8

I could not get it to work with $FrontEnd, but setting the ScreenStyleEnvironment on $FrontEndSession worked for me. Here text cells get two different backgrounds and font sizes, depending on the environment. ("Printout" is pink and large.) sseOpt = Options[$FrontEndSession, ScreenStyleEnvironment]; SetOptions[$FrontEndSession, ScreenStyleEnvironment ...


7

To long for a comment, but looks great on "10.0 for Mac OS X x86 (64-bit) (June 29, 2014)" with AR, Preview and Skim. Shut-down and restart your system and try with an alternative viewer ... Edit @Jens response is fantastic, right? The procedure improves the resolution dramatically and even reduced the size. I was able to test both algorithms on iMac ...


6

I think the better solution that I find so far is shown as below: SetOptions[SelectedNotebook[], PrintingStyleEnvironment -> "Printout", ShowSyntaxStyles -> True]


4

So what you basically have to do is to take the head of the arrow only. I was a bit lazy to rebuild the Polygon myself so I looked for a .m file related to Arrow and found Arrow.m in /usr/local/Wolfram/Mathematica/8.0/AddOns/LegacyPackages/Graphics which contains approximately the following function makehead: makehead[len_, wid_, cent_] := Polygon@{{0, 0}, ...


4

You can apply a strategy I learned from @Jens. Add the following to your notebook: Map[SetOptions[#, Prolog -> {{EdgeForm[], Texture[{{{0, 0, 0, 0}}}], Polygon[#, VertexTextureCoordinates -> #] &[{{0, 0}, {1, 0}, {1, 1}}]}}] &, {ParametricPlot}]; Give your plot a name: im1 = PlotU2Treh = ParametricPlot[ ...


4

I see this problem too, and I found it is fixed in Skim and Preview by using this function: rasterTrick[plot_] := Show[plot, Prolog -> {Opacity[0], Texture[{{{0, 0, 0, 0}}}], VertexTextureCoordinates -> {{0, 0}, {1, 0}, {1, 1}}, Polygon[{{0, 0}, {.1, 0}, {.1, .1}}]}] Export["regionIBD_MatrixPlot1.pdf", mPlot // rasterTrick] The ...


3

Set your File->Printing Settings->Page Setup as you want it. Set Format->Screen Environment to PrintOut. Most people (assumptions are risky) aren't printing out every notebook so the normal environment is much less cramped than PrintOut.


3

If the PDF file was composed with one of the latest security features of Adobe, you will not be able to parse. You need adobe Acrobat Pro to remove the security feature. This is assuming you have the priviledge to do so. Another option is to print the file to Paperport PDF convert to PDF format and re export to PDF. But this might defeat your purpose to ...


3

Another quick(?) and dirty way: Let nb be the notebook to be printed. E.g., execute nb = EvaluationNotebook[] in the notebook you would like. Then execute NotebookPrint[NotebookGet@nb /. CellGroupData[data_, Closed] :> CellGroupData[data, Open]] or Export["/tmp/foo.pdf", NotebookGet@nb /. CellGroupData[data_, Closed] :> CellGroupData[data, ...


2

I cannot reproduce this problem on OS X with the current version of Mathematica (9.0.1). However, I think I remember a similar problem existing in some earlier versions of Mathematica, at least on Windows. If my memory is correct, a possible solution was to use one of the PDF printers (Acrobat Distiller, redmon, etc.) to print the notebook to PDF instead ...


2

Rasterizing is a possibility: data = Notebook[{Cell[ BoxData[ToBoxes[ Rasterize[ Grid[{{11, 22}, {33, 44}}, Frame -> All, FrameStyle -> Directive[AbsoluteThickness[1], Orange]], ImageResolution -> 400](*end of Grid*)]]](*end of Cell*)}]; Export[FileNameJoin[{$TemporaryDirectory, "grid.pdf"}], data]; ...


2

I'm posting a separate answer to show what I did but please upvote @JoseECalderon if you find this answer useful, as he led me in the right direction regarding security settings. Unfortunately the security settings on my document prevented even printing to a (clean) PDF: I found a blog post where someone needed to unlock exactly the documents I'm working ...


2

In Mathematica 9, (rm -rf)'s comment that fonts with the extension .otf (aka OpenType) can't be embedded still holds. In addition, I've also noticed that not all fonts with the extension .ttf can be embedded. When choosing a font for your PDF files, it might be best to always test the files in other environments where that font isn't installed.


2

This might help. Here I have a helper function to make the legend into an Inset: plot = Plot[Evaluate[Exp[-4 f] /. {{f -> t}, {f -> t^2}}], {t, 0, 3}, BaseStyle -> {FontSize -> 11, AbsoluteThickness[1.5]}, PlotStyle -> {Blue, Red}, AxesLabel -> {"t"}, PlotLabel -> "Negativity", PlotLegends -> Placed[{"OU", "FBM"}, ...


2

I can confirm that neither Mathematica 10, nor Mathematica 9 will import this file. Your installation is not broken. There is (very likely) nothing you can do to make Mathematica read this file. Your best best is transforming the PDF without changing it visually, then trying to import it again. There are many programs that can do this, including Adobe ...


2

The problem seems to be when the label is rotated. Check this: Export["test.pdf", ListPlot[{1, 2, 3}, Joined -> False, Frame -> True, FrameLabel -> {Rotate["\!\(\*SqrtBox[\(x\)]\)", \[Pi]/2], "\!\(\*SqrtBox[\(y\)]\)"}]] however if you accept unrotated label, you can use: Export["test.pdf", ListPlot[{1, 2, 3}, Joined -> False, ...


1

Edit I was thinking about some automation of your request. With the the following approach you can create a new notebook, show your tables and graphs and save a new notebook as PDF. SetDirectory@NotebookDirectory[]; some Code ... some Code List all global variables, see here: names = Select[Names["Global`*"], Head@Symbol[#] =!= Symbol && ...


1

A similar problem is being discussed in this thread. I'll copy my method of going around it here, in case someone stumbles on this thread through searches. I have been saving a file wit MatrixPlot (using Save As...-> PDF), and have encountered a similar problem. Turns out, MatrixPlot (and similar) data is being exported as a bitmap, which gets ...


1

Actually, the problem is with Mathematica's export, at least with Version 10. I have been saving a file wit MatrixPlot (using Save As...-> PDF), and have encountered the same problem. Turns out, MatrixPlot (and similar) data is being exported as a bitmap, which gets blurred in Adobe Reader 9 (which I have), even if "Smooth line art" and "Smooth images" is ...


1

AFAIK, the only documented options to Export pdf files are "ImageSize", "ImageResolution" and "AllowRasterization", so my answer would be no, natively. You could down-convert the Mathematica pdf file using Ghostscript (I haven't tried that myself) Run["gs -sDEVICE=pdfwrite -dNOPAUSE -dBATCH -dSAFER -dCompatibilityLevel=1.4 -sOutputFile=output.pdf ...


1

Since you mentioned squished axes values when using GraphicsGrid, you can use a combination of ImageSize and BaseStyle--along numerous options to tweak plots and graphics, more info here--within LogLogPlot to achieve the look you want (I haven't experimented with it much but I found font size at 1/20 of image size looks decent). You can also specify the ...


1

If you need to show the points at the arrow tips, you should specify them separately from the specification of the arrows. The points coordinates may be obtained from those of the arrows. Try this: textsize = 16; ah = 0.03; ps1 = 0.5; ps2 = 0.01; lstAr1 = {{{0.0, Sqrt[2]}, {0.35, Sqrt[2]}}, {{-0.1, -Sqrt[2]}, {-0.35, -Sqrt[2]}}, {{2 Pi + 0.1, ...


1

In the command line on linux (I am using fedora 20), try: pdftotext PDFFILE.pdf NEWFILE.txt Then in Mathematica: variable = Import[NEWFILE.txt, #] & /@ {"Element1", "Element2", "Element3", "Element4", "Element5"}; where "Element1..." are the elements obtained by Import [NEWFILE.txt, "Elements"] Then you can examine the variable using part: ...


1

I have found a solution that works but it is OS specific. The following code works on Linux with installed exiftools. A new function is provided (ExportPDF) that takes the same arguments as Export and an optional further argument "title". The PDF is produced with the standard export function and the command line tool exiftool is used to alter the title. If ...



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