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11

Caveat: Since this uses hidden, undocumented functions, it will probably break at some point in the future. Also, I do not have any knowledge of how these functions work, except guesses from observed behavior. Some information is available via Information. Under the hood of TexForm is Convert`TeX`ExpressionToTeX, which in turn calls Convert`TeX`BoxesToTeX ...


10

Mathematica 10 introduces IntegerName: IntegerName[n] gives a string containing the full English name of the integer n. IntegerName[n,"type"] gives a string of the specified type. Possible types include: "DigitsWords" a combination of three-digit numbers and words "Words" using only words "Approximate" the first few digits ...


9

The following works in both v9 and v10: style = Directive[Thick, Black]; ContourPlot[y - x^2, {x, 0, 1}, {y, 0, 1}, ContourStyle -> Directive[Thick, Black, Opacity[1]], FrameStyle -> style, PlotLegends -> BarLegend[Automatic, Method -> {FrameStyle -> style}]] The idea to use the (undocumented) Method option comes from inspecting the ...


8

The following may be useful as starters: WolframAlpha["femme from french to german",{{"Translation:TranslationData", 1}, "ComputableData"}] (* {" Frau | Ehefrau", " Frau"} *)


8

Part a response, Because you do not show additional information and do not describe the problem with the code, I show one approach. First we construct some helpers : ClearAll["Global`*"] SetDirectory@NotebookDirectory[]; siz1 = 250; siz2 = 500; tex1 = "What a long and interesting and certainly necessary title for \ a panel of functions."; title = ...


8

You can also use MapAt with Invisible or Style[#,White]&: f1 = MatrixForm[MapAt[Invisible, #, Position[#, Except[#2], {2}, Heads->False]]] &; (* or f1 = MatrixForm[MapAt[Style[#,White]&, #, Position[#, Except[#2], {2}, Heads->False]]] &; *) Example: m = RandomInteger[5, {5, 5}]; Row[Prepend[f1[m, #] & /@ {1, 2, 1 | 2}, ...


7

x = E^-n (2 E^-1 + E^2) + E^n (2 E^-2 + E); x /. Times[a_, b_] :> Times[a, ExpToTrig@b] E^n (E + 2 Cosh[2] - 2 Sinh[2]) + E^-n (2 Cosh[1] + Cosh[2] - 2 Sinh[1] + Sinh[2])


7

Right, it doesn't work, but you can use this alternative: Grid[{{"The Thick Red Frame"}}, Frame -> True, FrameStyle -> Directive[Red, Thickness@10]]


7

Because Inactivate acts on Heads of expressions, replaces them with Inactive[h] where h is the Head of the expression and prevents them from evaluating. And in your case the Head of x y is Times: FullForm[x y] Times[x, y] So Inactivate[x y] Gives: Where the Times did not evaluate. Hence, the result you get when you apply TraditionalForm.


7

It sounds like you're merely looking for Row: Cp = 1.5; deltastar = 0.123; Row[{ "The value for ", HoldForm[Subscript[C, p]], " is ", Cp, " and the value for ", HoldForm[Superscript[\[Delta], "*"]], " is ", deltastar, "." }] If this does not work for you please clearly state how it fails so that those issues can be directly addressed.


7

Looks like StringForm can achieve this: Cp = 1.5; deltastar = 0.123; Then: StringForm["The value for `1` is `2` and the value for `3` is `4`.", HoldForm @ Subscript[C, p], Cp, HoldForm @ Superscript[\[Delta], "*"], deltastar]


7

Version 10 introduced some undocumented functionality that makes it easier to explore the style hierarchy. As usual, "undocumented" === "buyer beware". We start by evaluating: StyleManager`OpenStyleManager This does nothing other than trigger the auto-loading of certain symbols. We'll come back to a more interesting use of this symbol later. Now, we ...


6

Here's how to add a permanent menu item and keyboard shortcut for Silvia's solution. (This can be easily adapted to Jens' solution for Mac OS.) 1. Add Package Copy Silvia's first code block that starts with Needs["NETLink`"] to a file and save it as UniCodeCopy.m in one of the directories included in $Path. 2. Initialize the Front End Save the ...


6

I propose using HoldForm rather than strings etc. {a, -a, 3 a, -3 a} /. n_Integer s_ /; Abs[n] > 1 :> Plus @@@ HoldForm @@ {Sign[n] Table[s, {Abs @ n}]} Output: Not only does this format exactly like manual entry of this expression, you can release it: % // ReleaseHold {a, -a, 3 a, -3 a} If you want it to be automatically released when ...


6

If someone is after an easy workaround, then here it is: First, you have to initialise the TeX conversion system by simply calling something like TeXForm[1] when you are working on a fresh Kernel. After that it is simply System`Convert`TeXFormDump`maketex["x"] = "{\\bf x}"; TeXForm[x^2 + 1] (* {\bf x}^2+1 *) For a detailed explanation, please see here. ...


6

x = {3, 1} y = {2, 5} a Defer[x] + b Defer[y] /. First@Solve[a x + b y == {7, 11}, {a, b}] (* x + 2 y *) Note that the output is usable as such: evaluate it and you'll get the combination result. If only integer coefficients are desired, changing the Solve to something like: Solve[a x + b y == {7, 11} && {a, b} \[Element] Integers, {a, b}] ...


6

Will a = -3; Print[Defer[\[FormalA] x + 5 + x^2] /. \[FormalA] -> a] -3 x + 5 + x^2 work for you?


6

Consider this: Inactivate[3*5 - 2 - 3] // FullForm Inactive[Plus][Inactive[Times][3, 5], -2, -3] RunnyKine is correct regarding the cause but he did not really explain the mechanism involved. Formatting rules typically apply to (sub)expressions with certain heads. This has nothing to do with evaluation per se, but rather the patterns in the ...


6

Here is a function that copies a Unicode string to the clipboard using JLink: Needs["JLink`"]; InstallJava[]; LoadJavaClass["java.awt.Toolkit", AllowShortContext -> False]; uniclip[s_String] := JavaBlock[ java`awt`Toolkit`getDefaultToolkit[]@getSystemClipboard[]@setContents[#, #]& @ JavaNew["java.awt.datatransfer.StringSelection", s] ...


6

Something like heldint = HoldForm[Integrate[r^3, {t, 0, 2 Pi}, {r, 0, 2}, {z, r^2, 4}]]; int = ReleaseHold[heldint]; Row[{heldint, " \[LongEqual] ", int, " \[TildeTilde] ", N[int]}] // TraditionalForm


6

TraditionalForm looks nice but it also incurs additional complexity in handling expressions. If you attempt to evaluate a TraditionalForm cell you will be asked if you wish to interpret it as input, and the equivalence is not always complete. Fortunately Mathematica is quite cabable of displaying formatted integrals in StandardForm. If you merely wrap ...


6

You people with your fancy version 10 have it too easy. StringJoin@Reverse@MapIndexed[ToString[#] <> {"", " thousand ", " million ", " billion ", " trillion" }[[First@#2]] &, Reverse@(FromDigits /@ Partition[PadLeft[#, 3 - Mod[#, 3, 1] + # &@Length@#] , 3])] &@ IntegerDigits[123456789] "123 million 456 ...


6

data = Table[(i + j) i (i - j), {i, 1, 2}, {j, 1, 22}]; The first step is to define a function to break up each row in the data into lines not exceeded the specified maximum line length. prep[row_, fieldWidth_, lineLength_] := Module[{items = Floor[lineLength/fieldWidth]}, Partition[row, items, items, 1, {}]] The second step is to do the ...


5

I think I would choose to use MakeBoxes and Defer for this: MakeBoxes[a_^Rational[1, x_], fmt_] := ToBoxes[a^Defer[1/x], fmt] Now: -Sqrt[a - bar] -(a - bar)^(1/2) This also catches cases that use RadicalBox: x^(1/3) // TraditionalForm x1/3 Defer is used to allow the output to be used as input. An alternative is Interpretation but that ...


5

Regarding your second question What I could not achieve as well was outputting raw LaTeX commands and to give you further insight, let me give you another possibility. To create a special LaTeX representation for a certain symbol you can simply call TeXForm[1]; (* initialise definitions *) System`Convert`TeXFormDump`maketex["foo"] = "\\foo" and now ...


5

What Format does Role of Format, as I understand it, is to set appropriate transformation rules. One can check those rules using FormatValues function: Format[x, TeXForm] = "{\\bf x}"; FormatValues[x] // FullForm (* List[RuleDelayed[HoldPattern[Format[x, TeXForm]], "{\\bf x}"]] *) One can also see those rules by inspecting symbol for which rules where ...


5

A solution for the issue at hand Based on your comments I believe you are looking for ScriptLevel itself: expr2 = "\!\(\*FractionBox[\(\[Alpha]\),\(360 \[Degree]\)]\)"; expr2 = Style[expr2, Bold, 30, ScriptLevel -> 0]; Grid[{{#, Column[{#}]}}] & @ expr2 For application at the Grid/Column level one can use ItemStyle: {#, Grid[{{#, Column[{#}, ...


5

Adapting an example in the docs you could do it this way: table[pairs_] := Grid[pairs, BaseStyle -> {TextAlignment -> Left}, Alignment -> {Left, Automatic}] Then use LegendLayout -> table, to give you: Edit To reverse it just use Reverse: reversetable[pairs_] := Grid[Reverse@pairs, BaseStyle -> {TextAlignment -> Left}, ...


5

Go To Format > Edit Stylesheet... and add this style to your private stylesheet: Cell[StyleData["Output", "SlideShow"], ShowCellLabel->False]


5

I post this for illustrative purposes. You can access values. I suggest looking at the properties of your model, e.g. if your model is nlm then nlm["Properties"]. Some data and model: wd = WeatherData["Brisbane", "Temperature", {{2004, 1, 1}, {2013, 12, 31}, "Day"}]; vl = QuantityMagnitude /@ wd["Values"]; bnl = ...



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